Incorporate the Benefit of Feng Shui into Your Yard

Experience the health benefits of feng shui by incorporating its design elements into your yard.

When incorporating feng shui design into your yard, even a very small space is adequate. brk-303-3__34127.jpg A huge area is great for those lucky enough to have it, but a more compact area can still be useful in feng shui design.

Feng shui techniques are identical whether you are working in your garden or your residence. As the energy map, or bagua, of your garden is an extension of your house’s bagua, you will need to start off by knowing the bagua of the house.

In order to make the most of feng shui, it is vital to start by knowing how to bolster each of its five elements.

An example of this is that Earth is the feng shui element you should have in the northeast section of your garden because that section of your garden connects to the energy of personal growth and self-cultivation. This could be the ideal spot to put a meditative Zen garden with some beautiful stones because these represent the Earth element in feng shui.

Southeast (money and abundance), East (health & family), and North (career & path in life) are feng shui areas perfect for a water feature.

Tips for Creating a Relaxing Interior or Outdoor Sanctuary

To attain the greatest sense of tranquility and harmony, be sure to include a feng shui fountain. The best idea is to get a garden or home waterfall. It is a wonderful complement to the decoration of any property. The best location for your outdoor fountain is a spot where you can see it from inside too.

Plants and flowers are also essential for the most striking water fountains. Plants and flowers that bloom in various seasons make the ideal accompaniment. The area will be further enhanced with small adornments like art, a fire pit, or interesting stones.

The Genius of Michelangelo’s Roman Wall Fountains

Michelangelo and Ammannati, two celebrated Florentine artists, made the first Roman wall fountains during the 16th century. In 1536 Michelangelo’s very first fountain in the Piazza del Campidoglio in Rome, part of the façade of the Palazzo Senatorio, was unveiled.

A conduit from the Aqua Felice was constructed later and it carried water to the Capitol making a more lavish water effect possible. Michelangelo, however, had expected this which led to addition of a larger basin styled on the forms of the late Cinquecento.

Was the well-known maestro the earliest to design wall fountains? The sculptor’s designs definitely shaped the future style of fountains in Italy. The Fountain of the River Gods at the Villa Lante, Bagnaia 1, and the Fountain of the Mugnone set between flights of stairs on the main axis of the Villa Pratolino are further models of this type of structure.

Sadly, Michelangelo was destined to put his own abilities aside and combine traditional elements into fountains based on Roman styles. Julius III (1550-1555) decided to have a fountain erected at the top of the Belvedere in the Vatican and instructed the Florentine artist to design a special wall fountain. A marble figure of Moses striking a stone streaming water was to be built as embellishment for the fountain. Rather than building the Moses sculpture, which would take too much time to finish, an antique figure of Cleopatra was used in its place, however. It was thought easier to use a classic sculpture above the fountain rather than have the eminent artist design a totally new figure.


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