Where are the World’s Most Grandiose Water Fountains?

The King Fahd Fountain (built in 1985) in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, has the tallest continually -running fountain on the planet. It spouts out water reaching 260 meters (853 feet) above the Red Sea.

The World Cup Fountain located in the Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002), comes in 2nd place with water jetting up 202 meters (663 feet). a-437__47957.jpg

Occupying third place is the Gateway Geyser (1995), situated near the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri. It rockets water 192 meters (630 feet) into the air and is currently the tallest fountain in the USA.

With water jetting 190 meters (620 feet) in the air, the Port Fountain in Karachi, Pakistan makes the list.

Number 4: On a typical day the water is limited to 91 meters (300 feet) at the Fountain Park feature in Fountain Hills, Arizona, but it is capable of pushing water up to 171 meters (561 feet) when all three pumps are working.

The Dubai Fountain opened in 2009 near to Burj Khalifa - the world's tallest building. Once every half hour, this fountain begins dancing to pre-recorded songs while shooting water 73 meters (240 feet) high. It also has extreme shooters, rarely used, which go as high as 150 meters (490 feet).

Built in 1970, the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet in Canberra, Australia, comes in at #7 shooting water up to 147 meters (482 feet).

And finally comes the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951) which measures 140 meters (460 feet) in height.

Fountains: Fundamental in any Japanese Gardens

You will never see a Japanese garden that does not include a water feature. The Japanese water fountain is considered representative of spiritual and physical cleansing, so it is typically placed in or near the doorways of temples or homes. Since water is supposed to be the focal point of a fountain, you will find that the designs are kept very straightforward.

You will also notice many fountains that have spouts crafted of bamboo. The bamboo spout is positioned over the basin, typically made of natural rocks, and water trickles out. In addition, it is vital to the overall look that it appear as if it has been out of doors for a long time. So that the fountain looks at one with nature, people customarily adorn it with natural stones, pretty flowers, and plants. To the owner of the fountain, it obviously is more than just attractive decoration.

If you are searching for another sort of look and feel, you can also get a fountain crafted of stone, place it in a bed of gravel, and decorate it with natural stones and live bamboo. In time, as moss progressively covers the rocks, it becomes even more natural-looking.

Wherever there is plenty of open space, you have the option to build a more extensive water feature. Nice add-ons include a babbling stream or tiny pool with koi in it.

Japanese fountains, however, do not necessarily need to have water in them. It is acceptable to use representations of water in lieu of real water, such as sand, rocks, or natural stones. In addition, flat rocks can be laid out close enough together to give the illusion of a rippling brook.

The First Water Features recorded in Human History.

As initially conceived, water fountains were crafted to be functional, guiding water from streams or reservoirs to the citizens of towns and villages, where the water could be utilized for cooking food, cleaning, and drinking. The force of gravity was the power source of water fountains up until the close of the nineteenth century, using the forceful power of water traveling down hill from a spring or brook to force the water through spigots or other outlets. Inspiring and spectacular, big water fountains have been designed as memorials in many societies. If you saw the first fountains, you wouldn't identify them as fountains. A stone basin, carved from rock, was the 1st fountain, utilized for holding water for drinking and ceremonial functions. Stone basins are theorized to have been 1st used around the year 2000 BC. The earliest civilizations that used fountains relied on gravity to drive water through spigots. These historic fountains were created to be functional, often situated along aqueducts, creeks and rivers to furnish drinking water. The Romans began building decorative fountains in 6 BC, most of which were metallic or natural stone masks of animals and mythological characters. A well-engineered collection of reservoirs and aqueducts kept Rome's public water fountains supplied with fresh water.


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