Water Elements: A Must Have in any Japanese Gardens

Japanese gardens typically feature a water element. They tend to be placed right at the entrance of Japanese temples and homes because they are thought to be representative of spiritual and physical cleansing. It is uncommon to see extravagantly-designed Japanese fountains since the focus is supposed to be on the water itself.

Moreover, water fountains with built-in bamboo spouts are very common. ft-193__47829.jpg The bamboo spout is placed over the basin, typically crafted of natural stones, and water trickles out. People generally make them appear weathered and worn, even when they are new. Natural elements such as plants and rocks are commonly put in place around a fountain so that it seems more in line with nature. Clearly, this fountain is something more than just a simple decoration.

For something a bit more distinctive, start with a bed of gravel, add a stone fountain, and then embellish it creatively with live bamboo and other natural elements. Over the years it starts to really blend into the surrounding nature as moss blankets the stone.

If you are lucky enough to have a big piece of open land you can create a water feature that is much more elaborate. Lots of people add a koi pond or a tiny stream as a final touch.

Japanese fountains, on the other hand, do not actually need to have water in them. Many people prefer to represent water with sand, gravel, or rocks rather than putting in actual water. You can also collect flat stones and position them close enough together that they look like water in motion.

The Tallest Water Features Across the World

Located in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, the King Fahd Fountain (1985) is the highest continually-functioning fountain worldwide. The water here shoots up to a elevation of 260 meters (853 feet) above the Red Sea.

The Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002), comes in 2nd with water levels of 202 meters (663 feet).

Located next to the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri, is third placed Gateway Geyser (1995). This fountain is considered the tallest in the United States with water reaching up to 192 meters (630 feet).

With water ejected 190 meters (620 feet) in the air, the Port Fountain in Karachi, Pakistan makes it on the list.

Number 4 is Water at Fountain Park (1970) situated in Fountain Hills, Arizona - it can reach up to 171 meters (561 feet) when all three pumps are running, even though it typically only reaches up to 91 meters (300 feet).

The Dubai Fountain, opened to the public in 2009, is located near the Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest building. It performs every 1/2 hour to previously recorded songs and shoots water up to 73 meters (240 feet) in height -it also has built in extreme shooters, though only used during special events, which reach 150 meters (490 feet) in height.

Number 7 is the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet in Canberra, completed in 1970, propelling water 147 meters (482 feet) high.

Last of all is the Jet d’Eau (1951) in Geneva, Switzerland, which measures 140 meters (460 feet).

A Genuine Roman Wonder: The Santa Maria Fountain in Cosmedin

Both Christian and pagan artifacts have been found in large quantities by archaeologists and restorers scouring the area of the Santa Maria in Cosmedin in Rome. The nearby basilica is largely famous for the marble sculpture known as the Bocca della Verità, (Mouth of Truth) located in its portico. The situation of the Santa Maria in Cosmedin fountain (1719) was not in a well-known neighborhood and was, therefore, not often visited. For the most part, visitors stayed away from the area because it was a drab and desolate part of the city. As part of a project to refurbish the piazza outside the church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin, the Italian architect Carlo Bizzaccheri was instructed by Pope Clement XI to design a fountain. August 11, 1717 saw the start of the work to put down the foundation of the church. The first stone to be placed in the foundation was consecrated and medallions bearing the illustrations of the Blessed Virgin, for whom the church is named, and St. John the Baptist, the patron saint of water, were also thrown in.


A Short History of Water Features
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A Brief History of Outdoor Water Fountains
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Choose from all Sorts of Exterior Fountains
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Experience the World’s Tallest Water Works
And at #8, we have the the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951), measuring 140 meters (460 feet). read more
Designing the Perfect Haven Inside or Outdoors
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