The Purpose of Water Features in Japanese Gardens

A water feature is an absolutely vital part of any Japanese garden. The Japanese water fountain is considered symbolic of spiritual and physical cleansing, so it is typically placed in or near the doorways of temples or homes. angel cherub__67925.original.jpg Since water is the most essential element of any Japanese fountain, the design is usually simple.

Bamboo is a widely accepted material to use for spouts and therefore often incorporated into water fountains. The water moves through the bamboo spout and accumulates in the stone basin below. It should have a worn-down, weathered look and feel as well. People want their fountain to seem as natural as possible, so they place plants, flowers, and stones around the fountain. Needless to say, this fountain is something more than just a simple decoration.

If you want to get a bit more artistic, try a stone fountain embellished with live bamboo and other natural elements placed on a bed of gravel. In time, as moss progressively covers the stones, it starts to look even more natural-looking.

If you are fortunate enough to have a big section of open land you can create a water feature that is much more elaborate. Lots of people add a koi pond or a tiny stream as a final touch.

However, water does not have to be an element in a Japanese water fountain. Good options include stones, gravel, or sand to represent water. Natural rocks that are smooth and laid out tightly together can be used to produce the illusion of flowing water.

Enhance Your Backyard with the Use of Feng Shui

When applied to your yard, feng shui design will draw its healthful energy into your home as well.

As far as the size of your garden goes, it is not especially important when incorporating feng shui design to it. Of course, a huge area is fantastic if you have it, but rest assured that feng shui works just as well in smaller spaces as well.

Feng shui methods are identical whether you are working in your garden or your residence. In order to know the energy map, or bagua, of your garden, you will first need to know your home’s bagua.

Before getting underway, make sure you understand the five elements of feng shui so that you can optimize their energy.

Feng shui design calls for the Earth element, for example, to be incorporated into the northeastern corner of your garden, as that area connects to self-cultivation and personal improvement energy. This could be the perfect place to put a meditative Zen garden with some attractive stones because these represent the Earth element in feng shui.

Think about integrating a water feature into these feng shui areas: East (health & family), North (career & path in life), or Southeast (money and abundance).

The First Garden Water Fountains recorded in Human History.

Villages and communities depended on practical water fountains to channel water for preparing food, bathing, and cleaning up from nearby sources like lakes, streams, or springs. A supply of water higher in elevation than the fountain was necessary to pressurize the movement and send water squirting from the fountain's spout, a system without equal until the later half of the 19th century. Fountains throughout history have been created as monuments, impressing hometown citizens and travelers alike. The common fountains of modern times bear little likeness to the first water fountains. A natural stone basin, carved from rock, was the first fountain, used for holding water for drinking and spiritual functions. Rock basins as fountains have been discovered from 2000 B.C.. The first fountains put to use in ancient civilizations relied on gravity to control the flow of water through the fountain. Drinking water was delivered by public fountains, long before fountains became ornate public statues, as attractive as they are functional. Animals, Gods, and religious figures dominated the very early ornate Roman fountains, starting to appear in about 6 B.C.. The extraordinary aqueducts of Rome supplied water to the spectacular public fountains, many of which you can go see today.


Early Crete & The Minoans: Garden Fountains
Various sorts of conduits have been unveiled through archaeological excavations on the isle of Crete, the cradle of Minoan society. They were used for water supply as well as removal of storm water... read more
The Minoan Civilization: Garden Fountains
During archaeological digs on the island of Crete, a variety of sorts of channels have been discovered. These provided water and eliminated it, including water from waste and deluges. The chief ingredients utilized were rock or clay. Terracotta was used... read more
Making the Perfect Retreat Inside or Outside
Plants and flowers are also crucial for the most striking water fountains. The best idea is to add some plants which be beautiful no matter what the weather is outside. Your fountain can be made even more personal by including items like statues or other... read more
Improve Your Garden with the Aid of Feng Shui
Consider integrating a water feature into these feng shui areas: East (health & family), North (career & path in life), or Southeast (money and abundance). read more
Commonplace Water Elements Seen in Japanese Gardens
Japanese fountains, on the other hand, do not really need to have water in them. Many people prefer to represent water with sand, gravel, or rocks rather than putting in real water. Natural rocks that are smooth and laid out tightly... read more