Incorporate the Power of Feng Shui into Your Garden

Introduce feng shui design to the layout of your yard so it can carry energy into your home.

When adding feng shui design into your yard, even a very small space works. Of course, a big area is fantastic if you have it, but rest assured that feng shui works just as well in smaller areas as well. a-431__83376.jpg

The same tools you employ to include feng shui design into your living space can be used in the garden. The first step is to know the bagua, or energy map, of your home, as your garden’s bagua will be an extension of that.

In order to make the most of feng shui, it is vital to start by understanding how to strengthen each of its five elements.

The Earth element, for example, should be positioned in the northeast section of your garden which is linked to the personal growth and self-cultivation energy in feng shui design. Since rocks symbolize the Earth element in feng shui, you might consider putting some into a serene Zen garden in the northeast corner of your yard.

A water element is a perfect addition to the following feng shui areas: Southeast (money & abundance), East (health & family), and North (career & path in life).

The Prevalence of Water Fountains in Japanese Gardens

Japanese gardens typically feature a water element. The Japanese water fountain is considered symbolic of spiritual and physical purifying, so it is customarily placed in or near the doorways of temples or homes. Since water is the most important component of any Japanese fountain, the design is usually simple.

You will also notice many fountains that have spouts built of bamboo. The water moves through the bamboo spout and collects in the stone basin underneath. Even when new, it should be crafted to look as if it has been outdoors for a long time. So that the fountain seems at one with nature, people customarily decorate it with natural stones, pretty flowers, and plants. To the owner of the fountain, it clearly is more than just nice decor.

An alternative is to buy a stone fountain, set it on a bed of rock, and place live bamboo and pretty stones around it. In time, as moss progressively covers the rocks, it starts to look even more natural-looking.

Wherever there is sufficient open space, you have the possibility to build a more extensive water feature. Charming add-ons include a babbling stream or tiny pool with koi in it.

Water, however, does not have to be used in a Japanese fountain. Attractive rocks, sand, or gravel are ideal alternatives to actual water, as they can be used to represent the water. The impression of a creek with running water can also be achieved by putting flat stones very closely together.

Impressive Water Fountains Around the World

Jeddah, Saudi Arabia has the leading continuously- running fountain known as the King Fahd Fountain (1985). It spouts out water reaching 260 meters (853 feet) above the Red Sea.

The Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002), comes in second with water heights of 202 meters (663 feet).

Located near the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri, is 3rd placed Gateway Geyser (1995). It propels water 192 meters (630 feet) into the air and is currently the tallest fountain in the United States.

Next is Port Fountain (2006) in Karachi, Pakistan, where the water shoots 190 meters (620 feet) high.

Number 4 is Water at Fountain Park (1970) situated in Fountain Hills, Arizona - it can attain up to 171 meters (561 feet) when all three pumps are working, even though it normally only reaches up to 91 meters (300 feet).

The Dubai Fountain opened in 2009 next to Burj Khalifa - the world's highest building. The fountain propels water up to 73 meters (240 feet) and performs once every half hour to pre-recorded music - and even has extreme shooters, not used in every show, which reach up to 150 meters (490 feet).

Propelling water up to 147 meters (482 feet) high, the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet (1970) in Canberra, Australia, comes in 7th.

And finally we have the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951) which measures 140 meters (460 feet) in height.


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