The Truth About Fountains in Japanese Landscapes

No Japanese garden is finished without a water element. You will often notice Japanese water fountains in the doorway of a temple or home due to the fact that they are regarded as symbolic of physical and spiritual cleansing. 50026ss__32848.jpg Since water is meant to be the focal point of a fountain, you will notice that the designs are kept very simple.

You will also see many fountains that have spouts crafted of bamboo. The bamboo spout is placed over the basin, typically crafted of natural stones, and water trickles out. It ought to have a worn-down, weathered appearance as well. Natural elements such as plants and rocks are often put in place around a fountain so that it seems more connected with nature. To the owner of the fountain, it obviously is more than just nice decoration.

An alternative is to buy a stone fountain, set it on a bed of rock, and place live bamboo and pretty stones around it. Over the years it begins to really blend into the surrounding nature as moss blankets the stone.

If you are lucky enough to have a big plot of open land you can create a water feature that is much more elaborate. Think about adding a beautiful final touch like a pond filled with koi or a tiny stream.

Water, nevertheless, does not have to be used in a Japanese fountain. Pretty rocks, sand, or gravel are ideal alternatives to actual water, as they can be used to represent the water. Natural rocks that are smooth and laid out tightly together can be used to produce the illusion of moving water.

Public Water Fountains Lost to History

The water from rivers and other sources was originally delivered to the residents of nearby communities and cities via water fountains, whose purpose was primarily practical, not aesthetic. A source of water higher in elevation than the fountain was necessary to pressurize the movement and send water spraying from the fountain's nozzle, a technology without equal until the late 19th century. The elegance and spectacle of fountains make them ideal for traditional monuments. Crude in style, the very first water fountains did not look much like present fountains. Crafted for drinking water and ceremonial reasons, the initial fountains were very simple carved stone basins.

The initial stone basins are suspected to be from about 2000 BC. Gravity was the energy source that operated the oldest water fountains. Drinking water was provided by public fountains, long before fountains became elaborate public statues, as striking as they are functional. Fountains with elaborate decoration started to show up in Rome in approximately 6 B.C., normally gods and animals, made with natural stone or copper-base alloy. A well-engineered system of reservoirs and aqueducts kept Rome's public water fountains supplied with fresh water.

Big Water Wonders Across the World

Referred to as the King Fahd Fountain (1985) found in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, it is the highest continuously operating fountain in the world. The water here shoots up to a elevation of 260 meters (853 feet) above the Red Sea.

Reaching water levels of 202 meters (663 feet), the World Cup Fountain in the Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002), is recognized as the second highest worldwide.

Located near the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri, is third placed Gateway Geyser (1995). It rockets water 192 meters (630 feet) into the air and is currently the tallest fountain in the USA.

With water ejected 190 meters (620 feet) in the air, the Port Fountain in Karachi, Pakistan makes it on the list.

Number 4 is Water at Fountain Park (1970) situated in Fountain Hills, Arizona - it can attain up to 171 meters (561 feet) when all three pumps are running, even though it normally only hits up to 91 meters (300 feet).

The Dubai Fountain opened in 2009 near to Burj Khalifa - the world's tallest building. Once every half hour, this fountain begins dancing to pre-recorded songs while shooting water 73 meters (240 feet) high. It also has extreme shooters, rarely used, which go as high as 150 meters (490 feet).

Built in 1970, the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet in Canberra, Australia, comes in at #7 shooting water up to 147 meters (482 feet).

And at #8, we have the the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951), measuring 140 meters (460 feet).


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