The Globe's Most Impressive Fountains

angel cherub__67925.original.jpg Located in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, the King Fahd Fountain (1985) is the highest continually-functioning fountain worldwide. The water here jets up to a elevation of 260 meters (853 feet) above the Red Sea.

Coming in second is the World Cup Fountain located in the Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002) with water blasting 202 meters (663 feet).

The Gateway Geyser (1995) situated next to the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri is number three on the list. This fountain is considered the tallest in the U.S. with water reaching up to 192 meters (630 feet).

The next on the list is Port Fountain located in Karachi, Pakistan which rockets water 190 meters (620 feet) into the heavens.

Number 4 is Water at Fountain Park (1970) situated in Fountain Hills, Arizona - it can reach up to 171 meters (561 feet) when all three pumps are running, even though it typically only hits up to 91 meters (300 feet).

The Dubai Fountain which made its debut in 2009 is located next to tallest building worldwide, the famous Burj Khalifa. It dances to pre-recorded music every half hour and rockets water to the height of 73 meters (240 feet) - it also has extreme shooters which reach 150 meters (490 feet), though these are only used on special occasions.

Jetting water up to 147 meters (482 feet) high, the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet (1970) in Canberra, Australia, comes in seventh.

And at #8, we have the the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951), measuring 140 meters (460 feet).

The First Outdoor Garden Fountains recorded in Human History.

As originally developed, water fountains were designed to be functional, guiding water from creeks or aqueducts to the inhabitants of towns and settlements, where the water could be utilized for cooking food, cleaning, and drinking. In the days before electrical power, the spray of fountains was powered by gravity alone, commonly using an aqueduct or water source located far away in the surrounding hills. Inspiring and spectacular, big water fountains have been constructed as monuments in nearly all societies. Simple in style, the 1st water fountains didn't appear much like present fountains. Basic stone basins crafted from nearby material were the original fountains, used for spiritual functions and drinking water. The oldest stone basins are presumed to be from around 2000 BC. The very first civilizations that utilized fountains depended on gravity to force water through spigots. These historic fountains were created to be functional, usually situated along reservoirs, streams and rivers to supply drinking water. The Romans began constructing decorative fountains in 6 B.C., most of which were bronze or stone masks of creatures and mythological characters. The City of Rome had an intricate system of aqueducts that furnished the water for the countless fountains that were located throughout the city.

Water Fountains: Fundamental in any Japanese Gardens

A water element is an absolutely vital part of any Japanese garden. You will often see Japanese water fountains in the doorway of a temple or home due to the fact that they are considered symbolic of physical and spiritual cleansing. It is unusual to see extravagantly-designed Japanese fountains because the focus is supposed to be on the water itself.

Bamboo is a widely accepted material to use for spouts and therefore often integrated into water fountains. The basin, which tends to be built of stones, receives the water as it flows down from the bamboo spout. It should have a worn-down, weathered feel as well. Natural elements such as plants and rocks are frequently put in place around a fountain so that it seems more interconnected with nature. As you can probably surmise, this fountain is symbolic rather than just decorative.

If you want to get a bit more creative, try a stone fountain embellished with live bamboo and other natural elements placed on a bed of gravel. Before long moss begins to grow over the stones and cover them, and as that happens the area starts to look more and more like a natural part of the landscape.

If you are fortunate enough to have a big plot of open land you can create a water feature that is much more elaborate. Consider adding a lovely final touch like a pond filled with koi or a tiny stream.

Water, though, does not have to be used in a Japanese fountain. Good alternatives include stones, gravel, or sand to symbolize water. Natural rocks that are smooth and laid out tightly together can be used to give the illusion of running water.


A Brief History of Garden Water Fountains
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Water Fountains Recorded by History
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