A Magnificent Example of Roman Expertise: The Santa Maria in Cosmedin Water Fountain

p-722__65559.jpg Both Christian and pagan relics have been found in large quantities by archaeologists and restorers searching the area of the Santa Maria in Cosmedin in Rome. The celebrated marble sculpture called the Bocca della Verità (Mouth of Truth) can be seen in the portico of the basilica nearby. Built in 1719, the Santa Maria in Cosmedin water fountain was relatively unknown and located far from sight making it difficult to visit. The part of town where it was located was forlorn and bleak which generally kept visitors away. As part of an effort to modernize the square outside the church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin, the Italian architect Carlo Bizzaccheri was instructed by Pope Clement XI to design a fountain. The task of laying down the church’s foundation started on August 17, 1717. The first stone to be placed in the foundation was blessed and medals bearing the illustrations of the Blessed Virgin, for whom the church is named, and St. John the Baptist, the patron saint of water, were also thrown in.

Historic Crete & The Minoans: Outdoor Fountains

On the Greek island of Crete, excavations have unearthed channels of different sorts. These delivered water and extracted it, including water from waste and storms. They were typically constructed from terracotta or stone. When prepared from terracotta, they were usually in the format of canals and round or rectangular conduits. There are a couple of examples of Minoan terracotta pipes, those with a shortened cone form and a U-shape which have not been observed in any civilization since that time. Knossos Palace had a sophisticated plumbing network made of terracotta pipes which ran up to three meters under ground. The clay conduits were additionally utilized for accumulating and saving water. These clay pipelines were essential to perform: Underground Water Transportation: This system’s undetectable nature may suggest that it was primarily planned for some sort of ritual or to allocate water to restricted groups. Quality Water Transportation: The conduits could also have been utilized to haul water to fountains which were different from the city’s standard technique.

Ways to the Benefits of Feng Shui to Your Garden

Experience the health benefits of feng shui by incorporating its design elements into your yard.

As far as the size of your yard goes, it is not particularly important when adding feng shui design to it. It is fabulous to have a huge space to work with, but do not worry if the area is small since you can still incorporate feng shui design.

Whether you are bringing feng shui design to your home or garden, the tools are the same. Since the energy map, or bagua, of your garden is an extension of your house’s bagua, you will need to begin by knowing the bagua of the house.

In order to make the most of feng shui, it is crucial to start by understanding how to bolster each of its five elements.

Feng shui design calls for the Earth element, for example, to be integrated into the northeastern corner of your garden, as that section connects to self-cultivation and personal improvement energy. A Zen garden with some nice natural rocks is perfect for that spot, as the rocks represent the Earth element.

Consider incorporating a water feature into these feng shui areas: East (health & family), North (career & path in life), or Southeast (money and abundance).


The Minoan Society: Outdoor Fountains
On the Greek island of Crete, excavations have discovered conduits of multiple types. Along with delivering water, they distributed water which gathered from... read more
Garden Water Fountains Lost to History
Towns and communities depended on working water fountains to conduct water for cooking, washing, and cleaning from nearby sources like lakes, channels, or creeks. ... read more
Visit the World’s Biggest Fountains
Lastly is the Jet d’Eau (1951) in Geneva, Switzerland, which measures 140 meters (460 feet). read more
Explore the World’s Biggest Water Works
And finally comes the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951) which measures 140 meters (460 feet) in height. read more
Explore the World’s Most Incredible Water Features
And finally comes the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951) which measures 140 meters (460 feet) in height. read more
Visit the World’s Most Impressive Water Displays
And at #8, we have the the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951), measuring 140 meters (460 feet). read more