Wind Chimes: Perfect for the Patio

Go for wind chimes that are simple in design in order to avoid any incongruity in decor designs. This way they will blend in perfectly wherever they are placed. And remember, the significance of sound is greater than the visual when it comes to wind chimes. In fact, many of the more decorative types of wind chimes are not made in such a way that allows for the same pristine sound quality as those of a simple aluminum design. Suspending your chimes at various heights is important when making your very own wind chime garden. 6277-13804__96839.jpg For instance, setting up your wind chimes on a sundeck, in a small line of trees, or amidst flowers can create a beautiful outdoor environment. The blowing breeze will produce a sound that will emanate throughout your entire yard. If you want to enjoy the aesthetic aspect of wind chimes, make sure they are in line of vision by placing them where they will reflect the sunlight at sunrise and at sundown. Aluminum wind chime gardens fit in well with flowing water (such as waterfalls or birdbaths), stone decors and evergreens.

The Roman Water Fountains of Michelangelo

During the 16th century two renown Florentine sculptors by the names of Michelangelo and Ammannati designed the first wall features in Rome. The fountain in the Piazza del Campidoglio in Rome, which was finished in 1536 and became part of the façade of the Palazzo Senatorio, was Michelangelo’s first design. A conduit from the Aqua Felice was built later and it brought water to the Capitol making a more lavish water effect possible. Michelangelo, however, had expected this which led to addition of a larger basin styled on the forms of the late Cinquecento.

The question remains as to whether the celebrated maestro was the earliest to build wall fountains. His designs undoubtedly inspired the type of fountain which dominates throughout Italy.

The Fountain of the River Gods at the Villa Lante, Bagnaia 1, and the Fountain of the Mugnone arranged between flights of stairs on the main axis of the Villa Pratolino are further examples of this type of structure.

Sadly, Michelangelo was destined to put his own talents aside and combine conventional elements into fountains based on Roman styles. A brand-new fountain at the top of the Belvedere in the Vatican was authorized by Julius III (1550-1555) and it fell to the talented artist to create an archetypal structure. A marble statue of Moses striking a rock streaming water was to be built as embellishment for the fountain. Unfortunately for the sculptor, this idea was denied because it would take a lot of time to build and a classical statue of Cleopatra was used instead. A design by the well-known artist was thought to be too time-consuming, therefore, an ancient sculpture placed above the fountain seemed to be a better choice.

The Prevalence of Water Features in Japanese Backyards

No Japanese garden is complete without a water feature. Since Japanese water fountains are seen as emblematic of physical and spiritual cleansing, they are often positioned in the doorway of buildings or shrines. Since water is the most important component of any Japanese fountain, the design is usually simple.

Many people also get a water fountain that includes a bamboo spout. The water flows through the bamboo spout and collects in the stone basin underneath. People typically make them seem weathered and worn, even when they are new. People want their fountain to seem as natural as possible, so they position plants, flowers, and stones around the fountain. As you can likely guess, this fountain is symbolic rather than purely decorative.

For something a bit more distinctive, start with a bed of gravel, add a stone fountain, and then embellish it imaginatively with live bamboo and other natural elements. In time, as moss progressively covers the rocks, it becomes even more natural-looking.

Bigger water features can be developed if there is enough open land. Lots of people add a koi pond or a small stream as a final touch.

There are other options if you do not want to put water in your Japanese fountain. Good alternatives include stones, gravel, or sand to symbolize water. You can also assemble flat stones and position them close enough together that they look like water in motion.


Michelangelo’s Roman Water Fountains
Michelangelo’s amazing talent was put aside because he was compelled to design fountains uniting classical elements and a Roman style. A new fountain at the top of the... read more
The Popularity of Water Fountains in Japanese Landscapes
However, water does not need to be an element in a Japanese water fountain. Lots of people decide to represent water with sand, gravel, or rocks rather... read more