Historic Crete & The Minoans: Water Fountains

On the Greek island of Crete, excavations have unearthed channels of several types. 6053_6504__92550.jpg They not merely aided with the water supply, they extracted rainwater and wastewater as well. The chief materials utilized were stone or clay. There were clay pipes, both round and rectangular as well as waterways made from the same material. The cone-like and U-shaped terracotta pipes which were uncovered haven’t been found in any other society. Terracotta pipes were put down underneath the floor surfaces at Knossos Palace and used to distribute water. Along with circulating water, the clay pipes of the Minoans were also made use of to accumulate water and accumulate it. These clay pipelines were needed to perform: Underground Water Transportation: This hidden process for water movement could possibly have been chosen to furnish water to particular individuals or activities. Quality Water Transportation: Some scholars think that these pipes were utilized to create a different distribution technique for the residence.

The Roman Water Fountains of Michelangelo

The 16th century saw the creation of the first Roman wall fountains, the designs of two celebrated Florentine sculptures, Michelangelo and Ammannati. In 1536 Michelangelo’s earliest fountain in the Piazza del Campidoglio in Rome, part of the façade of the Palazzo Senatorio, was displayed. A conduit from the Aqua Felice was built later and it carried water to the Capitol making a more impressive water effect possible. Michelangelo had foreseen this, however, and built a bigger basin styled on the art of the late Cinquecento.

Was the famous artist the originator of the wall fountain? The sculptor’s designs truly influenced the future style of fountains in Italy. The styles found at the Fountain of the River Gods at the Villa Lante, Bagnaia 1, and the Fountain of the Mugnone, set between the stairway on the main axis of the Villa Pratolino, represent other examples of this style.

Regrettably, Michelangelo was destined to put his own talents aside and combine conventional elements into fountains based on Roman styles. Julius III (1550-1555) decided to have a fountain constructed at the top of the Belvedere in the Vatican and commissioned the Florentine master to design a special wall fountain. A marble Moses striking the rock from which water flowed was to adorn the fountain. Rather than building the Moses sculpture, which would take too much time to finish, an antique figure of Cleopatra was used in its place, however. A design by the well-known artist was thought to be too time-consuming, therefore, an ancient depiction placed above the fountain seemed to be a better alternative.

Where are the Planet's Biggest Water Elements?

Referred to as the King Fahd Fountain (1985) located in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, it is the highest continuously operating fountain in the world. The water reaches the amazing height of 260 meters (853 feet) over the Red Sea.

Reaching water heights of 202 meters (663 feet), the World Cup Fountain in the Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002), is recognized as the 2nd highest worldwide.

Occupying third place is the Gateway Geyser (1995), located close to the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri. It propels water 192 meters (630 feet) into the air and is currently the tallest fountain in the USA.

Next is Port Fountain (2006) in Karachi, Pakistan, where the water shoots 190 meters (620 feet) high.

Number 4: On a typical day the water is limited to 91 meters (300 feet) at the Fountain Park feature in Fountain Hills, Arizona, but it is capable of propelling water up to 171 meters (561 feet) when all three pumps are working.

The Dubai Fountain was opened in 2009 next to Burj Khalifa - the world's tallest building. It dances to pre-recorded music every half hour and rockets water to the height of 73 meters (240 feet) - it also has extreme shooters which reach 150 meters (490 feet), though these are only used on special occasions.

Constructed in 1970, the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet in Canberra, Australia, comes in at #7 shooting water up to 147 meters (482 feet).

And finally comes the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951) which measures 140 meters (460 feet) in height.


The Early Civilization: Fountains
During archaeological excavations on the island of Crete, many varieties of conduits have been detected. These supplied water and extracted it, including water from waste and deluges. They were commonly made from clay or rock. Anytime clay was... read more
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Simple wind chimes function better than more complex ones so as to not create imbalance in decor styles. The main goal is for them to fit in easily anywhere they are placed. And... read more
The Globe's Most Splendid Water Elements
And at number 8, we have the the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951), measuring 140 meters (460 feet). read more