Water Features: The Minoan Society

p-656__69068.jpg Various different kinds of conduits have been discovered through archaeological excavations on the isle of Crete, the birthplace of Minoan civilization. They were used for water supply as well as removal of storm water and wastewater. The majority were made from clay or even rock. Terracotta was employed for channels and conduits, both rectangle-shaped and spherical. Among these were clay pipes that were U shaped or a shortened, cone-like shape which have only showed up in Minoan culture. Knossos Palace had a sophisticated plumbing system made of terracotta pipes which ran up to three meters below ground. The clay pipes were additionally made use of for amassing and saving water. This required the terracotta piping to be capable of holding water without seepage. Underground Water Transportation: This concealed process for water movement could possibly have been utilized to provide water to certain men and women or occasions. Quality Water Transportation: The conduits may also have been used to carry water to water fountains that were distinct from the city’s regular system.

Michelangelo’s Roman Wall Fountains

During the 16th century two famous Florentine artists by the names of Michelangelo and Ammannati made the first wall features in Rome. The first fountain Michelangelo made came in 1536 with the building of the Campidoglio in Rome which was to make part of the Palazzo Senatorio's façade. The construction of a conduit from the Aqua Felice to the Capitol, which allowed for a more beautiful water display, was included years later. Michelangelo, however, had anticipated this which led to use of a larger basin styled on the forms of the late Cinquecento.

The question remains as to whether the celebrated maestro was the earliest to build wall fountains. The fountain styles found in Italy undeniably show the influence of his designs. The Fountain of the River Gods at the Villa Lante, Bagnaia 1, and the Fountain of the Mugnone arranged between flights of stairs on the main axis of the Villa Pratolino are further models of this type of structure.

Michelangelo’s amazing talent was put aside because he was forced to design fountains uniting classical elements and a Roman style. The Florentine master was commissioned by Julius III (1550-1555) to design a unique fountain to be placed at the top of the passageway of the Belvedere in the Vatican. The fountain was to be decorated with a marble sculpture of Moses striking a stone from which water flowed. Rather than making the Moses sculpture, which would take too much time to finish, an antique figure of Cleopatra was used in its place, however. It was considered easier to use a traditional piece of art above the fountain rather than have the eminent artist design a totally new figure.

The First Outdoor Fountains recorded in Human History.

Water fountains were at first practical in purpose, used to deliver water from rivers or springs to cities and hamlets, supplying the residents with fresh water to drink, bathe, and prepare food with. The force of gravity was the power source of water fountains up until the end of the 19th century, using the forceful power of water traveling down hill from a spring or creek to force the water through valves or other outlets. Frequently used as memorials and commemorative structures, water fountains have inspired travelers from all over the globe all through the centuries. If you saw the earliest fountains, you wouldn't identify them as fountains. A natural stone basin, carved from rock, was the very first fountain, utilized for holding water for drinking and spiritual functions. 2000 BC is when the earliest identified stone fountain basins were used. The first fountains put to use in ancient civilizations relied on gravity to manipulate the circulation of water through the fountain. The placement of the fountains was driven by the water source, which is why you’ll usually find them along aqueducts, waterways, or streams. Fountains with embellished Gods, mythological beasts, and creatures began to appear in Rome in about 6 B.C., built from rock and bronze. A well-designed collection of reservoirs and aqueducts kept Rome's public water fountains supplied with fresh water.


The Original Fountains
Water fountains were initially practical in purpose, used to convey water from canals or creeks to cities and villages, supplying the residents with clean... read more
The Tallest Water Wonders Across the World
And at #8, we have the the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951), measuring 140 meters (460 feet). read more
Big Water Wonders Across the World
And at number 8, we have the the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951), measuring 140 meters (460 feet). read more