A Magnificent Example of Roman Talent: The Santa Maria in Cosmedin Fountain

p-682__22083.jpg Amazing finds of both Christian and pagan roots have been made by archaeologists and restorers in the area around Santa Maria in Cosmedin in Rome. The nearby basilica is mainly famous for the marble sculpture known as the Bocca della Verità, (Mouth of Truth) located in its entryway. The situation of the Santa Maria in Cosmedin fountain (1719) was not in a well-known neighborhood and was, therefore, not often visited. The part of town where it was located was depressing and bleak which generally kept people away. It was then that the Italian architect Carlo Bizzaccheri was mandated by Pope Clement XI to erect a water fountain in the square outside the church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin in an effort to make the area more popular. The job of laying down the church’s first stones started on August 17, 1717. The consecration of the first stone to be placed in the foundation was followed by medals being thrown in showing the images of the Blessed Virgin, for whom the church is named, and St. John the Baptist, the patron saint of water.

Fountains: Fundamental in any Japanese Gardens

A water element is an essential part of any Japanese garden. You will often find Japanese water fountains in the doorway of a temple or home due to the fact that they are regarded as symbolic of physical and spiritual purification. It is unusual to see extravagantly-designed Japanese fountains because the focus is supposed to be on the water itself.

Moreover, water fountains with bamboo spouts are very prevalent. The basin, which tends to be fashioned of stones, collects the water as it flows down from the bamboo spout. It ought to have a worn-down, weathered look as well. Natural elements such as plants and rocks are often put in place around a fountain so that it seems more in line with nature.

Needless to say, this fountain is something more than just a regular decoration.

An alternate possibility is to find a stone fountain, set it on a bed of rock, and place live bamboo and pretty stones around it. After some years it begins to really blend into the surrounding nature as moss covers the stone.

Wherever there is enough open space, you have the option to build a more extensive water feature. Give some thought to adding a delightful final touch like a pond filled with koi or a tiny stream.

There are alternative alternatives if you do not want to put water in your Japanese fountain. Attractive rocks, sand, or gravel are good alternatives to actual water, as they can be used to symbolize the water. Natural rocks that are smooth and laid out tightly together can be used to give the illusion of moving water.

The World’s Tallest Fountains

Jeddah, Saudi Arabia has the highest continuously- running fountain known as the King Fahd Fountain (1985). Reaching incredible heights above the Red Sea, this fountain propels water 260 meters (853 feet) in the sky.

Reaching water heights of 202 meters (663 feet), the World Cup Fountain in the Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002), is recognized as the second highest worldwide.

The Gateway Geyser (1995) situated next to the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri is number three on the list. Considered the highest fountain in the United States, it propels water 192 meters (630 feet) into the sky.

Next is the fountain located in Karachi, Pakistan (Port Fountain) which jets water up to 190 meters (620 feet) in height.

Fountain Park in Fountain Hills, Arizona is number 4: it can jet water 171 meters (561 feet) high when the three pumps operate at full capacity, it is usually limited to 91 meters (300 feet).

The Dubai Fountain made its first appearance in 2009 next to the tallest building in the world, the Burj Khalifa. It performs every 1/2 hour to previously recorded music and propels water up to 73 meters (240 feet) in height -it also has built in extreme shooters, though only used during special events, which reach 150 meters (490 feet) in height.

Jetting water up to 147 meters (482 feet) high, the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet (1970) in Canberra, Australia, comes in 7th.

The last impressive fountain to make the list is the Jet d’Eau (1951) in Geneva, Switzerland, measuring 140 meters (460 feet).


Outdoor Fountains: The Minoan Society
Fountains and Water and the Minoan Civilization These were used to provide urban centers with water as well as to lessen flooding and get rid of waste... read more
Decorative Garden Fountains And Their Use In Crete & Minoa
Fountains and Water and the Minoan Civilization In conjunction with delivering water, they spread out water that gathered from deluges or waste material. Stone and clay were the elements... read more
The Minoan Civilization: Fountains
On the Greek island of Crete, excavations have discovered conduits of numerous types. In conjunction with offering water, they distributed water which... read more
The Original Fountains
Water fountains were initially practical in purpose, used to convey water from canals or creeks to cities and villages, supplying the residents with clean water to drink, bathe, and cook with. A source of water higher in elevation than the fountain was... read more
The Original Garden Water Features
Water fountains were initially practical in purpose, used to deliver water from canals or springs to cities and hamlets, supplying the residents with fresh water to drink, bathe, and cook with. In the years... read more