Public Fountains Lost to History

As initially developed, water fountains were crafted to be functional, guiding water from creeks or reservoirs to the inhabitants of towns and villages, where the water could be used for cooking, washing, and drinking. brk-303-2__92712.jpg In the days before electrical power, the spray of fountains was powered by gravity only, usually using an aqueduct or water resource located far away in the surrounding hills. The splendor and spectacle of fountains make them ideal for historical monuments. The contemporary fountains of modern times bear little likeness to the first water fountains. Basic stone basins created from local stone were the very first fountains, used for spiritual purposes and drinking water. The earliest stone basins are believed to be from around 2000 B.C.. The first fountains used in ancient civilizations depended on gravity to manipulate the flow of water through the fountain. The placement of the fountains was determined by the water source, which is why you’ll normally find them along aqueducts, waterways, or streams. The Romans began creating elaborate fountains in 6 BC, most of which were metallic or natural stone masks of animals and mythological heroes. A well-designed collection of reservoirs and aqueducts kept Rome's public fountains supplied with fresh water.

Tall Fountains Across the World

Jeddah, Saudi Arabia has the highest continuously- running fountain known as the King Fahd Fountain (1985).

Attaining incredible heights above the Red Sea, this fountain propels water 260 meters (853 feet) in the sky.

Coming in 2nd is the World Cup Fountain located in the Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002) with water blasting 202 meters (663 feet).

Located near the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri, is third placed Gateway Geyser (1995). It propels water 192 meters (630 feet) into the air and is currently the tallest fountain in the USA.

Next is Port Fountain (2006) in Karachi, Pakistan, where the water shoots 190 meters (620 feet) high.

Number 4 is Water at Fountain Park (1970) situated in Fountain Hills, Arizona - it can attain up to 171 meters (561 feet) when all three pumps are running, even though it typically only reaches up to 91 meters (300 feet).

The Dubai Fountain which made its debut in 2009 is located next to highest building worldwide, the famous Burj Khalifa. It dances to pre-recorded music every half hour and propels water to the height of 73 meters (240 feet) - it also has extreme shooters which reach 150 meters (490 feet), though these are only used on special occasions.

Constructed in 1970, the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet in Canberra, Australia, comes in at number 7 shooting water up to 147 meters (482 feet).

And finally we have the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951) which measures 140 meters (460 feet) in height.

Typical Water Fountains Found in Japanese Gardens

A water element is an important part of any Japanese garden. The Japanese water fountain is considered symbolic of spiritual and physical cleaning, so it is typically placed in or near the doorways of temples or homes. The design of Japanese fountains tends to be very basic because they are meant to draw attention to the water itself.

Moreover, water fountains that have bamboo spouts are very popular. The basin, which tends to be made of stones, receives the water as it trickles down from the bamboo spout. People typically make them appear weathered and worn, even when they are new. Natural elements such as plants and rocks are frequently put in place around a fountain so that it seems more connected with nature. As you can probably guess, this fountain is symbolic rather than just decorative.

For something a bit more one-of-a-kind, start with a bed of gravel, add a stone fountain, and then decorate it imaginatively with live bamboo and other natural elements. Gradually moss begins to creep over the stones and cover them, and as that happens the area begins to look more and more like a natural part of the landscape.

Wherever there is sufficient open space, you have the possibility to build a more extensive water feature. Lots of people put in a koi pond or a little stream as a final touch.

There are other options if you do not want to put water in your Japanese fountain. It is okay to use representations of water in lieu of real water, such as sand, rocks, or natural stones. The illusion of a creek with running water can also be achieved by placing flat stones very closely together.


Outdoor Garden Fountains And Their Use In Crete & Minoa
Various types of conduits have been uncovered through archaeological digs on the isle of Crete, the birthplace of Minoan civilization. These provided water and eliminated it, including water from... read more
Suggestions for Your Ideal Retreat Indoors or Out
The most gorgeous water fountains have flowers and plants. Choose plants that keep their appeal year-round. The area will be further enhanced with small adornments like art, a fire pit, or attractive stones. read more