Garden Water Fountains Lost to History

Towns and communities depended on working water fountains to conduct water for cooking, washing, and cleaning from nearby sources like lakes, channels, or creeks. The force of gravity was the power source of water fountains up until the close of the 19th century, using the forceful power of water traveling downhill from a spring or brook to force the water through spigots or other outlets. brk-303-1__85451.jpg Fountains all through history have been created as memorials, impressing local citizens and tourists alike. When you see a fountain today, that is not what the very first water fountains looked like. A natural stone basin, crafted from rock, was the first fountain, utilized for holding water for drinking and ceremonial functions. Stone basins are theorized to have been 1st made use of around 2,000 BC. The first fountains put to use in ancient civilizations relied on gravity to control the movement of water through the fountain. The placement of the fountains was influenced by the water source, which is why you’ll commonly find them along aqueducts, canals, or streams. Fountains with decorative Gods, mythological beasts, and animals began to show up in Rome in about 6 BC, made from natural stone and bronze. Water for the open fountains of Rome was brought to the city via a intricate system of water aqueducts.

The Spectacular Santa Maria in Cosmedin Water Fountain in Rome

Incredible finds of both Christian and pagan origin have been made by archaeologists and restorers in the area around Santa Maria in Cosmedin in Rome. The nearby basilica is largely famous for the marble sculpture known as the Bocca della Verità, (Mouth of Truth) located in its portico. Built in 1719, the Santa Maria in Cosmedin fountain was not well known and situated far from sight making it hard to visit. The part of town where it was located was depressing and bleak which generally kept visitors away. It was then that the Italian architect Carlo Bizzaccheri was instructed by Pope Clement XI to build a water fountain in the square outside the church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin in an attempt to make the area more popular. August 11, 1717 saw the beginning of the work to lay down the foundation of the church. Medals bearing the imagery of the Blessed Virgin, for whom the church is named, and of St. John the Baptist, the patron saint of water, were thrown in the foundation following the blessing of the first rock.

How to the Benefits of Feng Shui to Your Garden

Add feng shui design to the layout of your yard so it can bring energy into your household.

As far as the size of your garden goes, it is not especially important when introducing feng shui design to it. Of course, a big area is fantastic if you have it, but rest assured that feng shui works just as well in smaller spaces as well.

Feng shui tools are identical whether you are working in your garden or your house. In order to know the energy map, or bagua, of your garden, you will first want to know your home’s bagua.

There are five elements in feng shui theory, and you should learn how to use each of them to intensify the energy.

An example of this is that Earth is the feng shui element you should have in the northeast part of your garden because that part of your garden connects to the energy of personal growth and self-cultivation. The ideal addition to the northeast corner of your yard might be a peaceful Zen garden decorated with natural stone, as they represent the Earth element in feng shui.

Consider introducing a water feature into these feng shui areas: East (health & family), North (career & path in life), or Southeast (money and abundance).


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