Fountains: Important in any Japanese Landscapes

You will seldom see a Japanese garden that does not feature a water element. p_438__73324.jpg The Japanese water fountain is considered symbolic of spiritual and physical cleaning, so it is typically placed in or near the doorways of temples or homes. Since water is the most important element of any Japanese fountain, the design is normally simple.

You will also notice many fountains that have spouts made of bamboo. The bamboo spout is positioned over the basin, typically constructed of natural stones, and water trickles out. Even when new, it should be crafted to look as if it has been outside for a long time. So that the fountain looks at one with nature, people customarily enhance it with natural stones, pretty flowers, and plants. Needless to say, this fountain is something more than just a regular decoration.

An alternate possibility is to buy a stone fountain, set it on a bed of rock, and place live bamboo and pretty stones around it. Gradually moss begins to grow over the stones and cover them, and as that happens the area starts to look more and more like a natural part of the landscape.

Anyone who has an extensive space to work with can, of course, install a much bigger water feature. Give some thought to adding a lovely final touch like a pond filled with koi or a tiny stream.

Water, nevertheless, does not have to be used in a Japanese fountain. It is appropriate to use representations of water instead of real water, such as sand, rocks, or natural stones. The impression of a creek with moving water can also be achieved by putting flat stones very closely together.

How Feng Shui Turn Your Garden into A Good Place to Think

Incorporating feng shui design into your yard will help circulate its energy into your home and your life.

Size is not the primary concern when adding feng shui design to your garden. A huge area is great for those fortunate enough to have it, but a smaller area can still be useful in feng shui design.

Feng shui tools are identical whether you are working in your garden or your house. Your yard's bagua, or energy map, is an extension of your house's bagua, so it is essential to figure out your home’s first.

In order to make the most of feng shui, it is important to start by understanding how to strengthen each of its five elements.

The northeast corner of your garden, for instance, connects to personal growth and self-cultivation energy, and Earth is the feng shui element that is essential to incorporate it. This could be the optimal place to put a meditative Zen garden with some beautiful stones because these represent the Earth element in feng shui.

Anyone thinking about including a water element into their garden should place it in one of these feng shui areas: North (career & path in life), Southeast (money and abundance), or East (health & family).

The Earliest Public Fountains

Villages and communities depended on practical water fountains to funnel water for cooking, bathing, and cleaning up from nearby sources like lakes, channels, or creeks. The force of gravity was the power source of water fountains up until the close of the nineteenth century, using the forceful power of water traveling down hill from a spring or brook to push the water through valves or other outlets. Commonly used as memorials and commemorative edifices, water fountains have influenced men and women from all over the world all through the centuries. The common fountains of today bear little similarity to the very first water fountains. Created for drinking water and ceremonial reasons, the first fountains were basic carved stone basins. 2000 BC is when the oldest known stone fountain basins were originally used. Gravity was the power source that operated the earliest water fountains. The placement of the fountains was influenced by the water source, which is why you’ll commonly find them along aqueducts, waterways, or streams. Fountains with flowery decoration started to show up in Rome in approx. 6 BC, normally gods and creatures, made with stone or copper-base alloy. A well-designed collection of reservoirs and aqueducts kept Rome's public fountains supplied with fresh water.


Water Fountains Recorded by History
Water fountains were originally practical in function, used to bring water from rivers or creeks to towns and hamlets, supplying the residents with clean water to drink, wash, and prepare food with. ... read more
Choosing the Ideal Wind Bells and Chimes for You
In order to dodge possible clashes in design styles, select wind chimes which are basic in appearance. The main goal is for them to fit in effortlessly wherever they are placed. ... read more
Wind Bells and Chimes: Ideal for the Garden
Simple wind chimes work better than more complex ones so as to not create imbalance in decor styles. This way they will blend in perfectly wherever they are placed. When choosing wind chimes, remember that their sound is vastly more important... read more
Where are the World’s Biggest Fountains?
Last of all is the Jet d’Eau (1951) in Geneva, Switzerland, which measures 140 meters (460 feet). read more
Where are the World’s Most Grandiose Water Showpieces?
And finally we have the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951) which measures 140 meters (460 feet) in height. read more
The Simplest Way to Create the Optimal Haven Indoors or Outside
Make sure to include some beautiful flowers and plants, as they complement any water fountain. Plants and flowers that blossom in various seasons make the ideal ... read more