Integrate the Energy of Feng Shui into Your Garden

When applied to your yard, feng shui design will introduce its healthful energy into your home as well.

As far as the size of your garden goes, it is not extremely important when incorporating feng shui design to it. It is great to have a huge space to work with, but do not worry if the area is small since you can always introduce feng shui design. c_109__08491.jpg

The same tools you employ to introduce feng shui design into your home can be used in the garden. Your yard's bagua, or energy map, is an off-shoot of your home’s bagua, so it is essential to figure out your home’s first.

Before getting started, make sure you grasp the five elements of feng shui so that you can maximize their energy.

The northeast corner of your garden, for instance, connects to personal growth and self-cultivation energy, and Earth is the feng shui element that is necessary to integrate it. Since rocks symbolize the Earth element in feng shui, you might consider putting some into a tranquil Zen garden in the northeast corner of your yard.

Think about introducing a water feature into these feng shui areas: East (health & family), North (career & path in life), or Southeast (money and abundance).

Water Fountains: The Minoan Culture

Fountains and Water and the Minoan Civilization They not solely aided with the water supply, they removed rainwater and wastewater as well. Many were prepared from clay or even stone.

Terracotta was employed for channels and pipes, both rectangle-shaped and spherical. Among these were terracotta conduits that were U shaped or a shorter, cone-like form which have only appeared in Minoan culture. Terracotta piping were put down under the floor surfaces at Knossos Palace and utilized to circulate water. The terracotta water pipes were additionally used for collecting and holding water. In order to make this conceivable, the piping had to be fashioned to handle: Underground Water Transportation: This system’s undetectable nature may mean that it was originally created for some sort of ritual or to distribute water to restricted communities. Quality Water Transportation: Considering the indicators, a number of scholars advocate that these conduits were not attached to the popular water delivery system, offering the residence with water from a distinctive source.

Common Water Fountains Seen in Japanese Gardens

You will rarely see a Japanese garden that does not feature a water element. You will often find Japanese water fountains in the doorway of a temple or home due to the fact that they are thought to be symbolic of physical and spiritual cleansing. It is uncommon to see elaborately -designed Japanese fountains because the emphasis is supposed to be on the water itself.

Moreover, water fountains with built-in bamboo spouts are very popular. The water moves through the bamboo spout and collects in the stone basin below. People usually make them seem weathered and worn, even when they are new. So that the fountain seems at one with nature, people customarily decorate it with natural stones, pretty flowers, and plants. Clearly this fountain is much more than simply a pretty add-on.

For something a bit more unique, start with a bed of gravel, add a stone fountain, and then embellish it creatively with live bamboo and other natural elements. Eventually moss begins to grow over the stones and cover them, and as that happens the area starts to look more and more like a natural part of the landscape.

More substantial water features can be developed if there is enough open land. Think about adding a beautiful final touch like a pond filled with koi or a tiny stream.

There are different options if you do not want to put water in your Japanese fountain. Lots of people choose to represent water with sand, gravel, or rocks rather than putting in real water. The impression of a creek with trickling water can also be achieved by putting flat stones very closely together.


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Tall Fountains Around the World
And at #8, we have the the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951), measuring 140 meters (460 feet). read more
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The last impressive fountain to make the list is the Jet d’Eau (1951) in Geneva, Switzerland, measuring 140 meters (460 feet). read more
Tall Fountains Across the World
And finally comes the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951) which measures 140 meters (460 feet) in height. read more