Incorporate the Vitality of Feng Shui into Your Garden

twf029-fl__71641.jpg When applied to your yard, feng shui design will bring its beneficial energy into your home as well.

As far as the size of your garden goes, it is not particularly important when incorporating feng shui design to it. If you have a lush, eye-catching one, that is great, but even a small area works well with feng shui design.

Feng shui methods are identical whether you are working in your garden or your house. The first part is to know the bagua, or energy map, of your home, as your garden’s bagua will be an extension of that.

It is also crucial to know the five elements in the theory of feng shui and how best to use each one to make the most of its energy.

Feng shui design calls for the Earth element, for example, to be integrated into the northeastern corner of your garden, as that section connects to self-cultivation and personal development energy. Since rocks symbolize the Earth element in feng shui, you might consider putting some into a serene Zen garden in the northeast corner of your yard.

Southeast (money and abundance), East (health & family), and North (career & path in life) are feng shui areas ideal for a water element.

The Original Public Fountains

The water from rivers and other sources was initially delivered to the residents of nearby communities and cities by way of water fountains, whose purpose was largely practical, not aesthetic. The force of gravity was the power supply of water fountains up until the close of the nineteenth century, using the forceful power of water traveling downhill from a spring or creek to squeeze the water through spigots or other outlets. Inspiring and impressive, big water fountains have been constructed as memorials in most civilizations.

If you saw the first fountains, you probably would not identify them as fountains. A stone basin, carved from rock, was the very first fountain, utilized for containing water for drinking and ceremonial purposes. Pure stone basins as fountains have been found from 2,000 BC. The jet of water emerging from small spouts was pushed by gravity, the only power source builders had in those days. Situated near aqueducts or creeks, the practical public water fountains provided the local residents with fresh drinking water. Fountains with decorative Gods, mythological beasts, and creatures began to show up in Rome in about 6 B.C., built from natural stone and bronze. Water for the public fountains of Rome was delivered to the city via a elaborate system of water aqueducts.

The Prevalence of Water Features in Japanese Gardens

No Japanese garden is whole without a water feature. The Japanese water fountain is considered representative of spiritual and physical purifying, so it is typically placed in or near the doorways of temples or homes. Since water is the most essential element of any Japanese fountain, the design is generally simple.

Moreover, water fountains with built-in bamboo spouts are very popular. The basin, which tends to be built of stones, collects the water as it flows down from the bamboo spout. In addition, it is essential to the overall look that it appear as if it has been outdoors for a long time. Natural elements such as plants and rocks are commonly put in place around a fountain so that it seems more interconnected with nature. Obviously, this fountain is something more than just a regular decoration.

If you want to get a bit more imaginative, try a stone fountain embellished with live bamboo and other natural elements placed on a bed of gravel. After some years it begins to really blend into the surrounding nature as moss grows over the stone.

If you are lucky enough to have a big plot of open land you can create a water feature that is much more elaborate. Charming add-ons include a babbling stream or tiny pool with koi in it.

Japanese fountains, on the other hand, do not necessarily need to have water in them. Other alternatives include stones, gravel, or sand to represent water. Natural rocks that are flat and laid out tightly together can be used to produce the illusion of running water.


Public Garden Fountains Found in Historical Documents
Water fountains were originally practical in function, used to bring water from canals or creeks to cities and villages, supplying the residents with clean water to drink, wash, and... read more
Choose from all Kinds of External Water Features
Powered by sunlight, solar fountains are growing to be increasingly trendy. The reasons for this are varied, from the lack of wires and the reduced complexities to the lower power bills and the beneficial impact on our environment. There is no need ... read more
Tall Water Features Around the World
The last impressive fountain to make the list is the Jet d’Eau (1951) in Geneva, Switzerland, measuring 140 meters (460 feet). read more