How to Include the Benefits of Feng Shui to Your Yard

Incorporating feng shui design into your yard will help spread its energy into your home and your life.

As far as the size of your yard goes, it is not especially important when incorporating feng shui design to it. Of course, a huge area is great if you have it, but rest assured that feng shui works just as well in smaller spaces as well. p_512_p_513_p_520__75643.jpg

Whether you are bringing feng shui design to your home or garden, the methods are the same. As the energy map, or bagua, of your garden is an extension of your house’s bagua, you will need to start by understanding the bagua of the house.

It is also crucial to know the five elements in the theory of feng shui and how best to use each one to make the most of its energy.

An example of this is that Earth is the feng shui element you should include in the northeast section of your garden because that part of your garden connects to the energy of personal growth and self-cultivation. The ideal addition to the northeast corner of your yard might be a peaceful Zen garden decorated with natural stone, as they represent the Earth element in feng shui.

A water feature is a great addition to the following feng shui areas: Southeast (money & abundance), East (health & family), and North (career & path in life).

The Demand for Fountains in Japanese Landscapes

Japanese gardens usually include a water feature. Since Japanese water fountains are considered emblematic of physical and spiritual cleansing, they are often positioned in the doorway of buildings or shrines. It is unusual to see elaborately -designed Japanese fountains since the focus is supposed to be on the water itself.

You will also find many fountains that have spouts made of bamboo. The basin, which tends to be built of stones, collects the water as it trickles down from the bamboo spout. Even when new, it should be crafted to appear as if it has been out in the open for a long time.

People want their fountain to look as natural as possible, so they position plants, flowers, and stones around the fountain. Clearly this fountain is much more than merely a beautiful add-on.

For something a bit more distinctive, start with a bed of gravel, add a stone fountain, and then decorate it imaginatively with live bamboo and other natural elements. In time, as moss progressively covers the stones, it starts to look even more natural-looking.

Anyone who has an extensive space to work with can, of course, install a much larger water feature. Consider adding a delightful final touch like a pond filled with koi or a tiny stream.

However, water does not have to be an element in a Japanese water fountain. Lots of people choose to represent water with sand, gravel, or rocks rather than putting in actual water. Natural rocks that are smooth and laid out tightly together can be used to create the illusion of moving water.

Roman Wall Fountains: Michelangelo’s Masterpieces

The 16th century saw the creation of the most ancient Roman wall fountains, the products of two celebrated Florentine sculptures, Michelangelo and Ammannati. The first fountain Michelangelo made came in 1536 with the building of the Campidoglio in Rome which was to be part of the Palazzo Senatorio's façade. Built some years later, a conduit from the Aqua Felice was added which brought water into the Capitol permitting a greater water display. Styled on the late Cinquecento, Michelangelo built a larger basin, anticipating the building of the conduit.

Did the introduction of wall fountains begin with the famed sculptor? The fountain styles found in Italy undeniably show the influence of his designs. The Fountain of the River Gods at the Villa Lante, Bagnaia 1, and the Fountain of the Mugnone found between flights of stairs on the main axis of the Villa Pratolino are further illustrations of this type of structure.

Michelangelo’s amazing talent was put aside because he was compelled to design fountains uniting classical elements and a Roman style. An original wall fountain for the top of the corridor of the Belvedere in the Vatican was commissioned to the famed artist by Julius III (1550-1555). The famed artist was asked to design a marble figure of Moses striking a stone from which water streamed forth. The idea of the Moses figure was rejected, however, because of the time it would take to create it and was therefore replaced by an antique image of Cleopatra. An ancient figure was thought to be simpler to put up over the fountain than the creation of a completely new statue by the famed artist.


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