A Concise History of Public Fountains

Towns and communities relied on practical water fountains to channel water for preparing food, washing, and cleaning up from local sources like ponds, streams, or springs. In the years before electric power, the spray of fountains was powered by gravity exclusively, usually using an aqueduct or water resource located far away in the surrounding hills. Frequently used as memorials and commemorative structures, water fountains have impressed men and women from all over the planet throughout the centuries. 315574-2703__55141.jpg Rough in design, the very first water fountains did not look much like present fountains. The very first accepted water fountain was a natural stone basin created that served as a receptacle for drinking water and ceremonial purposes. Natural stone basins are thought to have been 1st utilized around 2,000 BC. The spraying of water appearing from small spouts was pushed by gravity, the lone power source creators had in those days. The location of the fountains was influenced by the water source, which is why you’ll commonly find them along aqueducts, waterways, or rivers. Fountains with ornamental Gods, mythological monsters, and creatures began to appear in Rome in about 6 B.C., built from natural stone and bronze. The impressive aqueducts of Rome delivered water to the spectacular public fountains, many of which you can travel to today.

Michelangelo’s Roman Wall Fountains

During the 16th century two famous Florentine sculptors by the names of Michelangelo and Ammannati designed the first wall features in Rome. Michelangelo’s first fountain was revealed in 1536 in the Piazza del Campidoglio in Rome and makes up part of the facade of the Palazzo Senatorio. A number of years later, a more extravagant water show was made feasible with the extension of the Aqua Felice into the Capitol. Styled on the late Cinquecento, Michelangelo created a larger basin, anticipating the development of the conduit.

Was the famed maestro the mastermind of the wall fountain? The fountain styles seen in Italy definitely show the influence of his designs. The styles seen at the Fountain of the River Gods at the Villa Lante, Bagnaia 1, and the Fountain of the Mugnone, set between the flight of steps on the central axis of the Villa Pratolino, are other examples of this style.

Michelangelo’s unique talent was put aside because he was forced to design fountains uniting classical elements and a Roman style. An original wall fountain for the top of the corridor of the Belvedere in the Vatican was commissioned to the reknowned sculptor by Julius III (1550-1555). The fountain was to be decorated with a marble depiction of Moses hitting a stone from which water flowed. However, an ancient figure of Cleopatra replaced the statue of Moses because the latter would take too much time build.

An ancient figure was thought to be simpler to put up over the fountain than the creation of a completely new statue by the famed artist.

Ancient Crete & The Minoans: Fountains

During archaeological digs on the island of Crete, a variety of kinds of conduits have been detected. They not only helped with the water supply, they extracted rainwater and wastewater as well. Stone and clay were the materials of choice for these conduits. Terracotta was employed for channels and water pipes, both rectangular and circular. The cone-like and U-shaped terracotta pipes which were uncovered have not been seen in any other culture. The water supply at Knossos Palace was maintained with a system of clay piping that was put under the floor, at depths going from a few centimeters to many meters. These Minoan conduits were additionally utilized for gathering and storing water, not just distribution. This called for the clay conduits to be capable of holding water without leaking. Underground Water Transportation: Initially this particular technique appears to have been created not quite for convenience but rather to supply water to certain individuals or rites without it being spotted. Quality Water Transportation: The water pipes could furthermore have been used to take water to water fountains that were distinct from the city’s standard process.


The Original Public Garden Fountains
As initially conceived, fountains were designed to be practical, guiding water from streams or aqueducts to the residents of towns and villages, where the water could be utilized for cooking, washing, and drinking. To... read more
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Do not forget to add plants, as they have an important impact on the charm of a water fountain. Look for plant types that flourish throughout the year. Your fountain can be made even more special by including things like statues or other artwork,... read more