Ways Feng Shui Turn Your Garden into a Haven

ft-243__28699.jpg Introduce feng shui design to the layout of your yard so it can carry energy into your household.

As far as the size of your yard goes, it is not extremely important when introducing feng shui design to it. Of course, a large area is great if you have it, but rest assured that feng shui works just as well in smaller areas as well.

Feng shui techniques are the same whether you are working in your garden or your residence. Your yard's bagua, or energy map, is an off-shoot of your home’s bagua, so it is important to figure out your home’s first.

In order to make the most of feng shui, it is crucial to start by comprehending how to bolster each of its five elements.

An example of this is that Earth is the feng shui element you should include in the northeast part of your garden because that section of your garden connects to the energy of personal growth and self-cultivation. Since rocks epitomize the Earth element in feng shui, you might consider putting some into a serene Zen garden in the northeast corner of your yard.

Anyone thinking about incorporating a water feature into their garden should place it in one of these feng shui areas: North (career & path in life), Southeast (money and abundance), or East (health & family).

The Demand for Water Elements in Japanese Landscapes

You will never see a Japanese garden that does not include a water feature.

You will often find Japanese water fountains in the doorway of a temple or home due to the fact that they are thought to be symbolic of physical and spiritual purification. Since water is supposed to be the central point of a fountain, you will notice that the designs are kept very straightforward.

Many people also choose a water fountain that has a bamboo spout. Under the bamboo spout is generally a stone basin which receives the water as it trickles down from the spout. People generally make them seem weathered and worn, even when they are new. Natural elements such as plants and rocks are commonly put in place around a fountain so that it seems more interconnected with nature. As you can probably surmise, this fountain is symbolic rather than purely decorative.

If you want to get a bit more imaginative, try a stone fountain enhanced with live bamboo and other natural elements placed on a bed of gravel. After some years it begins to really blend into the surrounding nature as moss blankets the stone.

Larger water features can be developed if there is enough open land. Give some thought to adding a lovely final touch like a pond filled with koi or a tiny stream.

Water, though, does not have to be used in a Japanese fountain. Lots of people prefer to represent water with sand, gravel, or rocks rather than putting in real water. The semblance of a creek with moving water can also be achieved by putting flat stones very closely together.

Where are the World’s Biggest Water Features?

The King Fahd Fountain ( crafted in 1985) in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, has the tallest consistently-running fountain on the planet. The water here shoots up to a elevation of 260 meters (853 feet) above the Red Sea.

The World Cup Fountain located in the Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002), comes in 2nd place with water shooting up 202 meters (663 feet).

The Gateway Geyser (1995) situated next to the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri is number three on the list. With water reaching 192 meters (630 feet) in the air, this fountain is the tallest in the U.S..

Next is the fountain located in Karachi, Pakistan (Port Fountain) which shoots water up to 190 meters (620 feet) in height.

Number 4: Fountain Park (1970), Fountain Hills, Arizona - although it can reach heights of 171 meters (561 feet) when all three pumps are operating, it only reaches 91 meters (300 feet) on a normal day.

The Dubai Fountain was opened in 2009 next to Burj Khalifa - the world's highest building. It dances to pre-recorded music every half hour and propels water to the height of 73 meters (240 feet) - it also has extreme shooters which reach 150 meters (490 feet), though these are only used on special occasions.

Jetting water up to 147 meters (482 feet) high, the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet (1970) in Canberra, Australia, comes in 7th.

Last of all is the Jet d’Eau (1951) in Geneva, Switzerland, which measures 140 meters (460 feet).


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