The Globe's Tallest Water Fountains

Jeddah, Saudi Arabia has the leading continuously- running water fountain known as the King Fahd Fountain (1985). b-026__96292.jpg Reaching incredible heights above the Red Sea, this fountain propels water 260 meters (853 feet) in the air.

The Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002), comes in second with water levels of 202 meters (663 feet).

Next to the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri, is the Gateway Geyser (1995) which reaches third place. Considered the tallest fountain in the United States, it propels water 192 meters (630 feet) into the sky.

The next on the list is Port Fountain located in Karachi, Pakistan which rockets water 190 meters (620 feet) into the sky.

Number 4 is Water at Fountain Park (1970) situated in Fountain Hills, Arizona - it can attain up to 171 meters (561 feet) when all three pumps are working, even though it typically only reaches up to 91 meters (300 feet).

The Dubai Fountain was opened in 2009 next to Burj Khalifa - the world's highest building. It performs every 1/2 hour to previously recorded songs and propels water up to 73 meters (240 feet) in height -it also has built in extreme shooters, though only used during special events, which reach 150 meters (490 feet) in height.

Jetting water up to 147 meters (482 feet) high, the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet (1970) in Canberra, Australia, comes in seventh.

And finally we have the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951) which measures 140 meters (460 feet) in height.

How Feng Shui Turn Your Yard into Place to Relax

Enjoy the health benefits of feng shui by adding its design elements into your yard.

As far as the size of your garden goes, it is not extremely important when adding feng shui design to it. Of course, a large area is fantastic if you have it, but rest assured that feng shui works just as well in smaller areas as well.

Feng shui techniques are identical whether you are working in your garden or your home. Since the energy map, or bagua, of your garden is an extension of your home's bagua, you will need to start off by understanding the bagua of the house.

It is also important to know the five elements in the theory of feng shui and how best to use each one to maximize its energy.

The northeast corner of your garden, for instance, connects to personal growth and self-cultivation energy, and Earth is the feng shui element that is essential to incorporate it. A Zen garden with some pretty natural rocks is ideal for that spot, as the rocks epitomize the Earth element.

A water element is a suitable addition to the following feng shui areas: Southeast (money & abundance), East (health & family), and North (career & path in life).

Commonplace Water Fountains Seen in Japanese Landscapes

You will seldom see a Japanese garden that does not include a water element. Since Japanese water fountains are seen as emblematic of physical and spiritual cleansing, they are often positioned in the doorway of buildings or shrines. Since water is the most important component of any Japanese fountain, the design is generally simple.

Many people also choose a water fountain that includes a bamboo spout. Underneath the bamboo spout is typically a stone basin which receives the water as it trickles down from the spout. It must have a worn-down, weathered look and feel as well. It is essential that the overall look of the fountain goes with the natural setting, so people typically place plants, rocks, and flowers around it. To the owner of the fountain, it clearly is more than just attractive decoration.

For something a bit more distinctive, start with a bed of gravel, add a stone fountain, and then decorate it imaginatively with live bamboo and other natural elements. The point is that over time it will start to look more and more like a natural part of the landscape, as moss slowly grows over the stones.

Bigger water features can be created if there is enough open land. Nice add-ons include a babbling brook or tiny pool with koi in it.

Japanese fountains, on the other hand, do not really need to have water in them. It is appropriate to use representations of water in place of real water, such as sand, rocks, or natural stones. In addition, flat rocks can be laid out close enough together to give the impression of a babbling brook.


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