The Importance of Water Elements in Japanese Gardens

You will rarely see a Japanese garden that does not have a water element. The Japanese water fountain is considered symbolic of spiritual and physical cleansing, so it is typically placed in or near the doorways of temples or homes. ft-305__20733.jpg The design of Japanese fountains tends to be very simple because they are meant to draw attention to the water itself.

Many people also get a water fountain that includes a bamboo spout. The water passes through the bamboo spout and accumulates in the stone basin below. It should have a worn-down, weathered feel as well. So that the fountain seems at one with nature, people normally enhance it with natural stones, pretty flowers, and plants. To the owner of the fountain, it obviously is more than just nice decoration.

If you are hoping for another sort of look and feel, you can also get a fountain crafted of stone, place it in a bed of gravel, and decorate it with natural stones and live bamboo. The point is that over time it will start to look more and more like a natural part of the area, as moss slowly grows over the stones.

If you are lucky enough to have a big piece of open land you can create a water feature that is much more elaborate. Think about adding a beautiful final touch like a pond filled with koi or a tiny stream.

However, water does not have to be an addition in a Japanese water fountain. Attractive rocks, sand, or gravel are ideal alternatives to actual water, as they can be used to symbolize the water. You can also collect flat stones and put them close enough together that they look like water in motion.

The Stupendous Santa Maria in Cosmedin Water Fountain in Rome

Both Christian and pagan artifacts have been found in large quantities by archaeologists and restorers scouring the area of the Santa Maria in Cosmedin in Rome. The well-known marble sculpture called the Bocca della Verità (Mouth of Truth) is located in the portico of the basilica nearby. Built in 1719, the Santa Maria in Cosmedin fountain was not well known and situated far from sight making it hard to visit. Since the nearby area was depressing and mostly abandoned, visitors were not particularly interested in visiting it. As part of an effort to modernize the piazza outside the church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin, the Italian architect Carlo Bizzaccheri was commissioned by Pope Clement XI to design a fountain. August 11, 1717 saw the beginning of the job to lay down the foundation of the church. The consecration of the first rock to be placed in the foundation was followed by medals being thrown in showing the images of the Blessed Virgin, for whom the church is named, and St. John the Baptist, the patron saint of water.

Ancient Crete & The Minoans: Garden Fountains

Archaeological digs in Minoan Crete in Greece have discovered varied kinds of conduits. They not solely aided with the water supply, they extracted rainwater and wastewater as well. They were commonly constructed from terracotta or stone. Whenever manufactured from clay, they were generally in the format of canals and spherical or rectangle-shaped pipes. These incorporated cone-like and U-shaped terracotta piping that were distinctive to the Minoans. Terracotta pipelines were employed to distribute water at Knossos Palace, running up to three meters under the flooring. The terracotta water pipes were additionally utilized for gathering and saving water. This required the clay conduits to be capable of holding water without leaking. Underground Water Transportation: This obscure setup for water movement may have been chosen to provide water to specified people or events. Quality Water Transportation: There is also data that indicates the pipes being made use of to provide for water fountains separately of the local system.


Early Crete & The Minoans: Water Features
During archaeological excavations on the island of Crete, a variety of varieties of conduits have been detected. These delivered water and eliminated it, including water from waste and deluges. The principle components utilized were stone or terracotta. When... read more
Experience the World’s Biggest Water Features
And finally we have the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951) which measures 140 meters (460 feet) in height. read more
How Feng Shui Turn Your Yard into Sanctuary
A water element is a suitable add-on to the following feng shui areas: Southeast (money & abundance), East (health & family), and North (career & path in life). read more
A Magnificent Example of Roman Expertise: The Santa Maria in Cosmedin Water Fountain
Both Christian and pagan relics have been found in large quantities by archaeologists and restorers searching the area of the Santa Maria in Cosmedin in Rome. The celebrated marble sculpture called the Bocca della Verità (Mouth of Truth) can be... read more