The Reason Behind Fountains in Japanese Gardens

You will rarely see a Japanese garden that does not have a water feature. fcl109__85359.jpg You will often see Japanese water fountains in the doorway of a temple or home due to the fact that they are regarded as symbolic of physical and spiritual cleansing. It is unusual to see elaborately -designed Japanese fountains because the emphasis is supposed to be on the water itself.

Bamboo is a widely accepted material to use for spouts and therefore often added into water fountains. The basin, which tends to be built of stones, collects the water as it trickles down from the bamboo spout. People generally make them look weathered and worn, even when they are new. People want their fountain to look as natural as possible, so they put plants, flowers, and stones around the fountain. Clearly, this fountain is something more than just a basic decoration.

If you are looking for another sort of look and feel, you can also get a fountain made of stone, place it in a bed of gravel, and decorate it with natural stones and live bamboo. In time, as moss slowly covers the rocks, it starts to look even more natural-looking.

Anyone who has an extensive spot to work with can, of course, out in a much bigger water feature. Give some thought to adding a beautiful final touch like a pond filled with koi or a tiny stream.

However, water does not have to be an element in a Japanese water fountain. Other alternatives include stones, gravel, or sand to represent water. Natural rocks that are smooth and laid out tightly together can be used to create the illusion of flowing water.

Incorporate the Power of Feng Shui into Your Garden

When applied to your yard, feng shui design will introduce its beneficial energy into your home as well.

As far as the size of your yard goes, it is not especially important when introducing feng shui design to it. If you have a lavish, charming one, that is great, but even a small area works well with feng shui design.

Whether you are bringing feng shui design to your home or garden, the approaches are the same. In order to know the energy map, or bagua, of your garden, you will first need to know your home’s bagua.

In order to make the most of feng shui, it is vital to start by understanding how to bolster each of its five elements.

The northeast corner of your garden, for instance, connects to personal growth and self-cultivation energy, and Earth is the feng shui element that is necessary to integrate it. A perfect addition to the northeast corner of your yard might be a tranquil Zen garden decorated with natural stone, as they represent the Earth element in feng shui.

People thinking about adding a water feature into their garden should place it in one of these feng shui areas: North (career & path in life), Southeast (money and abundance), or East (health & family).

Roman Water Fountains: Michelangelo’s Works of Art

The 16th century saw the creation of the most ancient Roman wall fountains, the designs of two celebrated Florentine sculptures, Michelangelo and Ammannati. The first fountain Michelangelo created came in 1536 with the building of the Campidoglio in Rome which was to be part of the Palazzo Senatorio's façade. Constructed some years later, a conduit from the Aqua Felice was added which brought water into the Capitol allowing a greater water display. Styled on the late Cinquecento, Michelangelo created a larger basin, anticipating the development of the conduit.

Was the reknowned maestro the first to create wall fountains? The fountain types found in Italy undeniably show the influence of his designs. Additional examples of this type of structure can be seen in the Fountain of the River Gods at the Villa Lante, Bagnaia 1, and the Fountain of the Mugnone which is located between flights of stairs on the central axis of the Villa Pratolino.

It seemed to be Michelangelo’s destiny to combine classic Roman characteristics into his fountains instead of using his own tremendous talents to design original pieces. An original wall fountain for the top of the passageway of the Belvedere in the Vatican was commissioned to the reknowned artist by Julius III (1550-1555). The talented artist was asked to design a marble figure of Moses striking a stone from which water flowed. The option of the Moses figure was abandoned, however, because of the time it would take to create it and was therefore replaced by an antique image of Cleopatra. A design by the well-known artist was thought to be too time-consuming, therefore, an ancient figure placed above the fountain seemed to be a better option.


The Original Water Features
Water fountains were at first practical in function, used to deliver water from canals or springs to towns and villages, providing the residents with fresh water to drink, wash, and prepare food... read more
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And finally comes the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951) which measures 140 meters (460 feet) in height. read more
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