A Concise History of Public Garden Fountains

Towns and villages relied on functional water fountains to funnel water for cooking, washing, and cleaning from local sources like lakes, channels, or springs. Gravity was the power supply of water fountains up until the end of the nineteenth century, using the forceful power of water traveling down hill from a spring or creek to force the water through valves or other outlets. b-026__96292.jpg Fountains all through history have been developed as memorials, impressing hometown citizens and visitors alike. The contemporary fountains of modern times bear little similarity to the very first water fountains. Basic stone basins created from nearby material were the first fountains, used for spiritual functions and drinking water. Natural stone basins as fountains have been recovered from 2,000 B.C.. The very first civilizations that made use of fountains depended on gravity to force water through spigots. These historic fountains were designed to be functional, frequently situated along aqueducts, creeks and waterways to provide drinking water. Fountains with embellished Gods, mythological monsters, and animals began to appear in Rome in about 6 BC, built from rock and bronze. A well-designed collection of reservoirs and aqueducts kept Rome's public water fountains supplied with fresh water.

The World’s Most Impressive Water Fountains

Located in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, the King Fahd Fountain (1985) is the highest continually-functioning fountain worldwide. The water reaches the amazing height of 260 meters (853 feet) over the Red Sea.

Coming in second is the World Cup Fountain located in the Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002) with water blasting 202 meters (663 feet).

Occupying third place is the Gateway Geyser (1995), situated near the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri. It propels water 192 meters (630 feet) into the air and is currently the tallest fountain in the USA.

Next is Port Fountain (2006) in Karachi, Pakistan, where the water jets 190 meters (620 feet) high.

Number 4: On a typical day the water is limited to 91 meters (300 feet) at the Fountain Park feature in Fountain Hills, Arizona, but it is capable of propelling water up to 171 meters (561 feet) when all three pumps are operating.

The Dubai Fountain, opened to the public in 2009, is located near the Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest building. The fountain shoots water up to 73 meters (240 feet) and performs once every half hour to pre-recorded music - and even has extreme shooters, not used in every show, which reach up to 150 meters (490 feet).

Number 7 is the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet in Canberra, completed in 1970, propelling water 147 meters (482 feet) high.

And finally we have the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951) which measures 140 meters (460 feet) in height.

Decorative Garden Fountains And Their Use In The Minoan Civilization

Fountains and Water and the Minoan Civilization They were used for water supply as well as removal of storm water and wastewater. The main materials utilized were stone or terracotta. When clay was used, it was normally for waterways as well as conduits which came in rectangular or circular forms. These included cone-like and U-shaped clay water lines which were exclusive to the Minoans. Terracotta pipes were put down beneath the floors at Knossos Palace and utilized to circulate water. These Minoan pipelines were also made use of for amassing and stocking water, not just distribution. This required the terracotta pipes to be suitable for holding water without leaking. Underground Water Transportation: This undetectable method for water movement may have been employed to provide water to certain people or activities. Quality Water Transportation: Given the proof, a number of historians propose that these pipes were not linked to the prevalent water delivery process, providing the castle with water from a various source.


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Commonplace Water Features Seen in Japanese Gardens
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