A Short History of Outdoor Water Fountains

angel cherub__67925.original.jpg As initially conceived, fountains were designed to be practical, directing water from streams or aqueducts to the citizens of cities and villages, where the water could be utilized for cooking, washing, and drinking. Gravity was the power supply of water fountains up until the close of the nineteenth century, using the forceful power of water traveling downhill from a spring or brook to squeeze the water through valves or other outlets. Fountains all through history have been developed as memorials, impressing local citizens and tourists alike. Simple in design, the first water fountains did not look much like contemporary fountains. A stone basin, carved from rock, was the first fountain, used for containing water for drinking and religious functions. 2000 BC is when the oldest known stone fountain basins were actually used. The force of gravity was the energy source that controlled the initial water fountains. Positioned near aqueducts or creeks, the functional public water fountains provided the local citizens with fresh drinking water. Fountains with decorative Gods, mythological beasts, and creatures began to appear in Rome in about 6 BC, crafted from natural stone and bronze. Water for the open fountains of Rome was delivered to the city via a complicated system of water aqueducts.

The Demand for Water Elements in Japanese Landscapes

No Japanese garden is finished without a water element. The Japanese water fountain is considered symbolic of spiritual and physical purifying, so it is customarily placed in or near the doorways of temples or homes. The design of Japanese fountains tends to be very basic because they are meant to call attention to the water itself.

Moreover, water fountains that have bamboo spouts are very prevalent. The bamboo spout is positioned over the basin, typically crafted of natural stones, and water trickles out. People typically make them appear weathered and worn, even when they are new. People want their fountain to appear as natural as possible, so they put plants, flowers, and stones around the fountain. To the owner of the fountain, it clearly is more than just nice decor.

For something a bit more one-of-a-kind, start with a bed of gravel, add a stone fountain, and then decorate it imaginatively with live bamboo and other natural elements. Over the years it begins to really blend into the surrounding nature as moss grows over the stone.

Larger water features can be designed if there is enough open land. Lots of people put in a koi pond or a little stream as a final touch.

There are alternative alternatives if you do not want to put water in your Japanese fountain.

Good alternatives include stones, gravel, or sand to symbolize water. Natural rocks that are smooth and laid out tightly together can be used to create the illusion of flowing water.

Making the Ideal Retreat Inside or Outside

One simple way to create a peaceful and serene area is to put in a feng shui fountain. This can be accomplished rather easily with a garden or home waterfall. The perfect addition to your decor is this type of element. Be sure to set up your outdoor fountain so that it is able to be seen from inside in order to get the most out of it.

The most attractive water fountains include flowers and plants. Plants and flowers that come into bloom in various seasons make the ideal accompaniment. The area will be further improved with small touches like art, a fire pit, or attractive stones.


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