Fountains: A Necessity in any Japanese Gardens

No Japanese garden is complete without a water element. You will often find Japanese water fountains in the doorway of a temple or home due to the fact that they are regarded as symbolic of physical and spiritual purification. p_499_1__07636.jpg Since water is meant to be the focal point of a fountain, you will notice that the designs are kept very straightforward.

You will also notice many fountains that have spouts crafted of bamboo. The bamboo spout is positioned over the basin, typically crafted of natural stones, and water trickles out. In addition, it is vital to the overall look that it appear as if it has been outdoors for a long time. It is vital that the overall look of the fountain goes with the natural surroundings, so people typically place plants, rocks, and flowers around it. Clearly this fountain is much more than merely a nice add-on.

For something a bit more unique, start with a bed of gravel, add a stone fountain, and then decorate it imaginatively with live bamboo and other natural elements. In time, as moss gradually covers the stones, it becomes even more natural-looking.

Wherever there is plenty of open space, you have the possibility to build a more extensive water feature. Nice add-ons include a babbling brook or tiny pool with koi in it.

Water, however, does not have to be used in a Japanese fountain. Lots of people decide to represent water with sand, gravel, or rocks rather than putting in actual water. The impression of a creek with moving water can also be achieved by placing flat stones very closely together.

The Early Civilization: Fountains

A variety of kinds of conduits have been found through archaeological digs on the isle of Crete, the cradle of Minoan society. They were used for water supply as well as removal of storm water and wastewater. The majority were prepared from clay or rock. Terracotta was used for canals and pipes, both rectangle-shaped and spherical. The cone-like and U-shaped terracotta piping that were discovered have not been seen in any other society. Terracotta piping were put down under the floor surfaces at Knossos Palace and used to move water. The clay conduits were also made use of for accumulating and holding water. These clay pipelines were needed to perform: Underground Water Transportation: the hidden method for water distribution could have been made use of to provide water to particular people or activities.

Quality Water Transportation: The conduits could also have been utilized to carry water to fountains which were different from the city’s normal system.

The Biggest Fountains Around the World

Located in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, the King Fahd Fountain (1985) is the tallest continually-functioning fountain worldwide. Attaining incredible heights above the Red Sea, this fountain jets water 260 meters (853 feet) in the air.

The World Cup Fountain located in the Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002), comes in 2nd place with water shooting up 202 meters (663 feet).

Occupying third place is the Gateway Geyser (1995), situated near the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri. Regarded as the highest fountain in the United States, it propels water 192 meters (630 feet) into the sky.

Next is the fountain located in Karachi, Pakistan (Port Fountain) which jets water up to 190 meters (620 feet) in height.

Number 4: On a typical day the water is limited to 91 meters (300 feet) at the Fountain Park feature in Fountain Hills, Arizona, but it is capable of propelling water up to 171 meters (561 feet) when all three pumps are functioning.

The Dubai Fountain made its first appearance in 2009 next to the tallest building in the world, the Burj Khalifa. Once every 1/2 hour, this fountain begins dancing to pre-recorded musical themes while shooting water 73 meters (240 feet) high. It also has extreme shooters, rarely used, which go as high as 150 meters (490 feet).

Propelling water up to 147 meters (482 feet) high, the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet (1970) in Canberra, Australia, comes in seventh.

And finally comes the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951) which measures 140 meters (460 feet) in height.


Fountains: The Minoan Culture
During archaeological excavations on the island of Crete, a variety of kinds of channels have been discovered. These were made use of to furnish cities with water as well as to alleviate flooding... read more
Outdoor Water Fountains Found in Historical Documents
As initially developed, water fountains were crafted to be practical, guiding water from creeks or aqueducts to the citizens of cities and villages, where the water could be used for cooking food,... read more
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