Public Garden Fountains Lost to History

Towns and communities relied on functional water fountains to channel water for preparing food, washing, and cleaning from local sources like lakes, streams, or springs. In the days before electrical power, the spray of fountains was powered by gravity exclusively, usually using an aqueduct or water resource located far away in the surrounding hills. The elegance and spectacle of fountains make them appropriate for historical memorials. a-412__39883.jpg The contemporary fountains of today bear little similarity to the first water fountains. A natural stone basin, crafted from rock, was the 1st fountain, used for holding water for drinking and religious purposes. The earliest stone basins are presumed to be from about 2000 B.C.. The jet of water appearing from small spouts was pushed by gravity, the sole power source builders had in those days. The location of the fountains was driven by the water source, which is why you’ll normally find them along reservoirs, waterways, or rivers. Fountains with ornate decoration began to show up in Rome in about 6 BC, usually gods and wildlife, made with stone or bronze. A well-engineered system of reservoirs and aqueducts kept Rome's public water fountains supplied with fresh water.

The Easiest Way to Design the Optimal Haven Indoors or Outside

One simple way to create a peaceful and relaxing area is to put in a feng shui fountain. The best plan is to get a garden or home waterfall. The ideal addition to your decor is this type of feature. Be sure to position your outdoor fountain so that it is visible from inside in order to get the most out of it.

Make sure to include some pretty flowers and plants, as they enrich any water fountain. Look for plant types that flourish throughout the year. Your fountain can be made even more special by adding items like statues or other artwork, picturesque shells, etc.

Common Water Features Seen in Japanese Landscapes

You will never see a Japanese garden that does not have a water feature. You will often see Japanese water fountains in the doorway of a temple or home due to the fact that they are thought to be symbolic of physical and spiritual purification. The design of Japanese fountains tends to be very simple because they are meant to call attention to the water itself.

Bamboo is a popular material to use for spouts and therefore often added into water fountains. The water flows through the bamboo spout and collects in the stone basin below. Even when new, it should be made to appear as if it has been out in the open for a long time. Natural elements such as plants and rocks are often put in place around a fountain so that it seems more in line with nature.

As you can perhaps surmise, this fountain is symbolic rather than purely decorative.

For something a bit more distinctive, start with a bed of gravel, add a stone fountain, and then decorate it artistically with live bamboo and other natural elements. After some years it starts to really blend into the surrounding nature as moss covers the stone.

Bigger water features can be designed if there is enough open land. Popular water feature extras are a koi pond or any sort of tiny pool, or even a wandering brook.

Water, though, does not have to be used in a Japanese fountain. It is appropriate to use representations of water instead of real water, such as sand, rocks, or natural stones. You can also gather flat stones and position them close enough together that they look like water in motion.


Garden Fountains: The Minoan Culture
On the Greek island of Crete, digs have discovered conduits of multiple varieties. These were used to furnish towns and cities with water as well as to minimize flooding and get rid of waste. The majority were made from clay or stone. Terracotta was... read more
Historic Crete & The Minoans: Water Features
Archaeological excavations in Minoan Crete in Greece have exposed several varieties of channels. They were used for water supply as well as removal of storm water and wastewater. Virtually all were made... read more
Where are the Planet's Biggest Fountains?
Lastly is the Jet d’Eau (1951) in Geneva, Switzerland, which measures 140 meters (460 feet). read more