The Early Civilization: Fountains

During archaeological excavations on the island of Crete, many varieties of conduits have been detected. These supplied water and extracted it, including water from waste and deluges. They were commonly made from clay or rock. Anytime clay was used, it was usually for waterways as well as water pipes which came in rectangular or spherical patterns. Amidst these were clay conduits which were U shaped or a shortened, cone-like shape which have exclusively appeared in Minoan society. brk-303-2__92712.jpg The water availability at Knossos Palace was maintained with a strategy of clay piping that was located beneath the floor, at depths going from a couple of centimeters to a number of meters. The piping also had other functions including gathering water and channeling it to a main area for storage. In order to make this possible, the conduits had to be tailored to handle: Subterranean Water Transportation: It’s not really known why the Minoans required to transport water without it being spotted. Quality Water Transportation: Given the evidence, a number of scholars advocate that these pipelines were not attached to the common water allocation system, providing the castle with water from a different source.

Santa Maria in Cosmedin: A Roman Water Fountain Worthy of Viewing

Both Christian and pagan artifacts have been found in large quantities by archaeologists and restorers scouring the area of the Santa Maria in Cosmedin in Rome. The Bocca della Verità (Mouth of Truth} is a famed marble sculpture located at the entrance of the nearby basilica. The location of the Santa Maria in Cosmedin fountain (1719) was not in a well-known neighborhood and was, therefore, not oftentimes visited. It was said that there was nothing worth seeing in this area, as it was abject and desolate making it an unfriendly place to visit. In order to modernize the square outside the church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin, Pope Clement XI commissioned an Italian architect by the name of Carlo Bizzaccheri to put up a water fountain for the area. Work on the church's foundation started on on August 11, 1717. After blessing of the first stone, medallions with the illustration of the Blessed Virgin, for whom the church is named, and of St. John the Baptist, the patron saint of water, were tossed into the foundation.

The Truth About Water Fountains in Japanese Gardens

No Japanese garden is complete without a water element. They tend to be put right at the entrance of Japanese temples and homes because they are considered representative of spiritual and physical cleansing. The design of Japanese fountains tends to be very simplistic because they are meant to call attention to the water itself.

You will also see many fountains that have spouts crafted of bamboo. The water moves through the bamboo spout and collects in the stone basin below. Even when new, it should be designed to appear as if it has been outdoors for a long time. People want their fountain to seem as natural as possible, so they place plants, flowers, and stones around the fountain. As you can perhaps guess, this fountain is symbolic rather than purely decorative.

For something a bit more distinctive, start with a bed of gravel, add a stone fountain, and then embellish it imaginatively with live bamboo and other natural elements. Eventually moss begins to grow over the stones and cover them, and as that happens the area begins to look more and more like a natural part of the landscape.

If you are lucky enough to have a big section of open land you can create a water feature that is much more elaborate. Think about adding a lovely final touch like a pond filled with koi or a tiny stream.

Japanese fountains, though, do not really need to have water in them. Potential options include stones, gravel, or sand to symbolize water. You can also collect flat stones and position them close enough together that they look like water in motion.


A Short History of Garden Water Fountains
The water from springs and other sources was initially provided to the occupants of nearby communities and cities via water fountains, whose design was primarily practical, not aesthetic. To produce water flow through a fountain... read more
Wind Bells and Chimes: Ideal for the Yard
Select wind chimes that are simple in design in order to prevent any incongruity in decor designs. The main goal is for them to fit in effortlessly wherever they are positioned. Select wind chimes that produce... read more
The Globe's Tallest Fountains
And at number 8, we have the the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951), measuring 140 meters (460 feet). read more
The World’s Most Amazing Fountains
And at number 8, we have the the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951), measuring 140 meters (460 feet). read more
Ways to Introduce the Benefits of Feng Shui to Your Garden
Think about incorporating a water feature into these feng shui areas: East (health & family), North (career & path in life), or Southeast (money and abundance). read more