How Feng Shui Turn Your Backyard into Sanctuary

Feel the health benefits of feng shui by incorporating its design elements into your yard.

When incorporating feng shui design into your gardden, even a very small area is adequate. b-026__96292.jpg A sizeable area is great for those privileged enough to have it, but a more compact area can still be useful in feng shui design.

Whether you are bringing feng shui design to your home or garden, the tools are the same. Your yard's bagua, or energy map, is an extension of your home’s bagua, so it is important to determine your home’s first.

There are five elements in feng shui theory, and you should know how to apply each of them to maximize the energy.

The Earth element, for example, should be located in the northeast portion of your garden which connects to the personal growth and self-cultivation energy in feng shui design. A Zen garden with some nice natural rocks is ideal for that spot, as the rocks epitomize the Earth element.

Think about introducing a water feature into these feng shui areas: East (health & family), North (career & path in life), or Southeast (money and abundance).

Water Features: Important in any Japanese Gardens

A water feature is an absolutely vital part of any Japanese garden. Since Japanese water fountains are viewed as symbolic of physical and spiritual cleansing, they are often positioned at the entrance of buildings or shrines. The design of Japanese fountains tends to be very simple because they are meant to call attention to the water itself.

Moreover, water fountains that have bamboo spouts are very prevalent. The basin, which tends to be fashioned of stones, collects the water as it flows down from the bamboo spout. People generally make them appear weathered and worn, even when they are new. So that the fountain appears at one with nature, people normally adorn it with natural stones, pretty flowers, and plants. Needless to say, this fountain is something more than just a simple decoration.

An alternative is to buy a stone fountain, set it on a bed of rock, and place live bamboo and pretty stones around it. The idea is that over time it will start to look more and more like a natural part of the surroundings, as moss slowly grows over the stones.

Anyone who has an extensive space to work with can, of course, out in a much bigger water feature. Lots of people put in a koi pond or a little stream as a final touch.

Japanese fountains, however, do not actually need to have water in them. Pretty rocks, sand, or gravel are good alternatives to actual water, as they can be used to represent the water. In addition, flat rocks can be laid out close enough together to create the illusion of a rippling brook.

The Globe's Most Splendid Water Elements

Located in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, the King Fahd Fountain (1985) is the tallest continually-functioning fountain worldwide. Reaching incredible heights above the Red Sea, this fountain jets water 260 meters (853 feet) in the air.

The Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002), comes in second with water heights of 202 meters (663 feet).

Located near the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri, is 3rd placed Gateway Geyser (1995). Considered the highest fountain in the United States, it propels water 192 meters (630 feet) into the sky.

Next is the fountain located in Karachi, Pakistan (Port Fountain) which jets water up to 190 meters (620 feet) in height.

Fountain Park in Fountain Hills, Arizona is number 4: it can jet water 171 meters (561 feet) high when the three pumps function at full capacity, it is usually limited to 91 meters (300 feet).

The Dubai Fountain, opened to the public in 2009, is located near the Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest building. Once every half hour, this fountain begins dancing to pre-recorded songs while shooting water 73 meters (240 feet) high. It also has extreme shooters, rarely used, which go as high as 150 meters (490 feet).

Propelling water up to 147 meters (482 feet) high, the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet (1970) in Canberra, Australia, comes in seventh.

Last of all is the Jet d’Eau (1951) in Geneva, Switzerland, which measures 140 meters (460 feet).


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