Explore the World’s Most Impressive Fountains

Known as the King Fahd Fountain (1985) found in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, it is the highest continuously operating fountain in the world. The water reaches the amazing height of 260 meters (853 feet) above the Red Sea.

The Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002), comes in second with water heights of 202 meters (663 feet). p_063__47565.jpg

The Gateway Geyser (1995) situated next to the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri is number three on the list. With water reaching 192 meters (630 feet) in the air, this fountain is the tallest in the U.S..

Next is Port Fountain (2006) in Karachi, Pakistan, where the water jets 190 meters (620 feet) high.

Number 4: On a typical day the water is limited to 91 meters (300 feet) at the Fountain Park feature in Fountain Hills, Arizona, but it is capable of pushing water up to 171 meters (561 feet) when all three pumps are functioning.

The Dubai Fountain made its first appearance in 2009 close to the tallest building in the world, the Burj Khalifa. It dances to pre-recorded music every half hour and propels water to the height of 73 meters (240 feet) - it also has extreme shooters which reach 150 meters (490 feet), though these are only used on special occasions.

Jetting water up to 147 meters (482 feet) high, the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet (1970) in Canberra, Australia, comes in seventh.

And at #8, we have the the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951), measuring 140 meters (460 feet).

Early Crete & The Minoans: Water Fountains

Archaeological digs in Minoan Crete in Greece have revealed several types of channels. These provided water and removed it, including water from waste and deluges. Rock and clay were the materials of choice for these channels. Terracotta was selected for channels and pipelines, both rectangle-shaped and circular. Among these were clay pipes which were U shaped or a shorter, cone-like shape which have only showed up in Minoan civilization. The water supply at Knossos Palace was maintained with a system of clay pipes which was put below the floor, at depths varying from a few centimeters to several meters. Along with distributing water, the clay water pipes of the Minoans were also utilized to accumulate water and accumulate it. This called for the clay conduits to be capable of holding water without losing it. Underground Water Transportation: the obscure process for water movement could possibly have been chosen to supply water to certain men and women or occasions. Quality Water Transportation: Given the data, several historians advocate that these conduits were not hooked up to the popular water allocation process, offering the residence with water from a distinctive source.

The First Outdoor Public Fountains recorded in Human History.

Villages and villages depended on working water fountains to conduct water for cooking, washing, and cleaning up from local sources like ponds, streams, or creeks. Gravity was the power source of water fountains up until the end of the nineteenth century, using the forceful power of water traveling downhill from a spring or creek to force the water through valves or other outlets. The elegance and wonder of fountains make them ideal for historic memorials. If you saw the earliest fountains, you probably would not identify them as fountains. A stone basin, crafted from rock, was the first fountain, used for containing water for drinking and religious purposes. Natural stone basins are thought to have been first used around 2000 BC. The spraying of water emerging from small jets was pushed by gravity, the only power source creators had in those days. Located near aqueducts or springs, the functional public water fountains furnished the local residents with fresh drinking water. Animals, Gods, and spectral figures dominated the very early decorative Roman fountains, beginning to appear in about 6 B.C.. Water for the open fountains of Rome arrived to the city via a elaborate system of water aqueducts.


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The water from creeks and other sources was originally delivered to the citizens of nearby communities and municipalities by way of water fountains, whose design was primarily... read more
The First Public Fountains recorded in Human History.
As initially conceived, water fountains were crafted to be practical, directing water from creeks or aqueducts to the inhabitants of cities and settlements, where the water could be used for cooking, cleaning, and drinking. In... read more
The Globe's Most Amazing Water Fountains
The last impressive fountain to make the list is the Jet d’Eau (1951) in Geneva, Switzerland, measuring 140 meters (460 feet). read more
Where are the Planet's Tallest Water Displays?
Lastly is the Jet d’Eau (1951) in Geneva, Switzerland, which measures 140 meters (460 feet). read more