Experience the World’s Most Incredible Water Works

Located in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, the King Fahd Fountain (1985) is the highest continually-functioning fountain worldwide. It spouts out water reaching 260 meters (853 feet) above the Red Sea.

Coming in 2nd is the World Cup Fountain located in the Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002) with water shooting 202 meters (663 feet).

The Gateway Geyser (1995) situated next to the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri is #3 on the list. With water reaching 192 meters (630 feet) in the air, this fountain is the tallest in the U.S.. a-387__50922.jpg

With water ejected 190 meters (620 feet) in the air, the Port Fountain in Karachi, Pakistan makes the list.

Number 4: On a typical day the water is limited to 91 meters (300 feet) at the Fountain Park feature in Fountain Hills, Arizona, but it is capable of pushing water up to 171 meters (561 feet) when all three pumps are operating.

The Dubai Fountain which made its debut in 2009 is situated next to highest building worldwide, the famous Burj Khalifa. It dances to pre-recorded music every half hour and rockets water to the height of 73 meters (240 feet) - it also has extreme shooters which reach 150 meters (490 feet), though these are only used on special occasions.

Making it in the top 8 is the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet in Canberra (1970) which measures 147 meters (482 feet).

The last impressive fountain to make the list is the Jet d’Eau (1951) in Geneva, Switzerland, measuring 140 meters (460 feet).

Enhance Your Backyard with the Use of Feng Shui

When applied to your yard, feng shui design will draw its healthy energy into your home as well.

Size is not the main consideration when adding feng shui design to your garden. It is great to have a huge space to work with, but do not worry if the area is small since you can always introduce feng shui design.

Feng shui tools are identical whether you are working in your garden or your home. Your yard's bagua, or energy map, is an off-shoot of your house's bagua, so it is essential to figure out your home’s first.

Before getting started, make sure you grasp the five elements of feng shui so that you can maximize their energy.

An example of this is that Earth is the feng shui element you should include in the northeast part of your garden because that section of your garden connects to the energy of personal growth and self-cultivation. The ideal addition to the northeast corner of your yard might be a tranquil Zen garden decorated with natural stone, as they represent the Earth element in feng shui.

Think about integrating a water feature into these feng shui areas: East (health & family), North (career & path in life), or Southeast (money and abundance).

Typical Water Features Seen in Japanese Landscapes

You will seldom see a Japanese garden that does not include a water feature. Since Japanese water fountains are seen as symbolic of physical and spiritual cleansing, they are often positioned in the doorway of buildings or shrines. Since water is the most important element of any Japanese fountain, the design is normally simple.

You will also notice many fountains that have spouts made of bamboo. Underneath the bamboo spout is typically a stone basin which receives the water as it flows down from the spout. It must have a worn-down, weathered appearance as well. So that the fountain looks at one with nature, people normally decorate it with natural stones, pretty flowers, and plants. Clearly this fountain is much more than simply a pretty add-on.

If you want to get a bit more imaginative, try a stone fountain embellished with live bamboo and other natural elements placed on a bed of gravel. After some years it starts to really blend into the surrounding nature as moss blankets the stone.

Wherever there is sufficient open space, you have the possibility to build a more extensive water feature. Popular water feature additions are a koi pond or any sort of small pool, or even a meandering brook.

Japanese fountains, though, do not really need to have water in them. Pretty rocks, sand, or gravel are good alternatives to actual water, as they can be used to symbolize the water. You can also collect flat stones and put them close enough together that they look like water in motion.


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