Experience the World’s Most Incredible Water Displays

Located in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, the King Fahd Fountain (1985) is the tallest continually-functioning fountain worldwide. Attaining incredible heights above the Red Sea, this fountain jets water 260 meters (853 feet) in the sky. twf036-ei__22446.jpg

Reaching water heights of 202 meters (663 feet), the World Cup Fountain in the Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002), is recognized as the 2nd highest worldwide.

Next to the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri, is the Gateway Geyser (1995) which reaches third place. Considered the tallest fountain in the United States, it propels water 192 meters (630 feet) into the sky.

Next is Port Fountain (2006) in Karachi, Pakistan, where the water jets 190 meters (620 feet) high.

Number 4: On a typical day the water is limited to 91 meters (300 feet) at the Fountain Park feature in Fountain Hills, Arizona, but it is capable of propelling water up to 171 meters (561 feet) when all three pumps are operating.

The Dubai Fountain which made its debut in 2009 is located next to tallest building worldwide, the famous Burj Khalifa. It performs every 1/2 hour to previously recorded music and propels water up to 73 meters (240 feet) in height -it also has built in extreme shooters, though only used during special events, which reach 150 meters (490 feet) in height.

Making it in the top 8 is the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet in Canberra (1970) which measures 147 meters (482 feet).

And finally we have the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951) which measures 140 meters (460 feet) in height.

Santa Maria in Cosmedin: A Roman Fountain Worthy of Seeing

Both Christian and pagan artifacts have been found in large quantities by archaeologists and restorers searching the area of the Santa Maria in Cosmedin in Rome. Situated in the portico of the nearby basilica one can see the famous marble sculpture known as the Bocca della Verità (Mouth of Truth). When the Santa Maria in Cosmedin fountain was created in 1719, it was off the beaten track and generally unknown as a result. It was said that there was nothing worth seeing in this area, as it was bleak and abandoned making it an unfriendly place to visit. As part of a project to modernize the piazza outside the church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin, the Italian architect Carlo Bizzaccheri was instructed by Pope Clement XI to design a fountain. Work on the church's foundation began on on August 11, 1717. Medallions bearing the images of the Blessed Virgin, for whom the church is named, and of St. John the Baptist, the patron saint of water, were thrown in the foundation following the blessing of the first rock.

The First Outdoor Water Features recorded in Human History.

As originally conceived, fountains were designed to be functional, directing water from streams or aqueducts to the residents of cities and settlements, where the water could be utilized for cooking food, cleaning, and drinking. In the years before electric power, the spray of fountains was powered by gravity only, usually using an aqueduct or water resource located far away in the surrounding mountains. Inspirational and impressive, prominent water fountains have been crafted as memorials in most societies. Simple in style, the 1st water fountains didn't look much like contemporary fountains. Basic stone basins created from local material were the original fountains, used for spiritual ceremonies and drinking water.

Rock basins are theorized to have been 1st made use of around the year 2000 BC. Early fountains put to use in ancient civilizations relied on gravity to regulate the flow of water through the fountain. The location of the fountains was driven by the water source, which is why you’ll normally find them along reservoirs, waterways, or streams. The Romans began creating elaborate fountains in 6 B.C., most of which were metallic or stone masks of creatures and mythological heroes. A well-engineered system of reservoirs and aqueducts kept Rome's public fountains supplied with fresh water.


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