Big Water Wonders Across the World

The King Fahd Fountain ( crafted in 1985) in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, has the tallest consistently-running fountain on the planet. The water reaches the astonishing height of 260 meters (853 feet) above the Red Sea. brk-306-2__48339.jpg

Coming in second is the World Cup Fountain located in the Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002) with water shooting 202 meters (663 feet).

Next to the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri, is the Gateway Geyser (1995) which reaches third place. With water reaching 192 meters (630 feet) in the air, this fountain is the tallest in the United States.

With water ejected 190 meters (620 feet) in the air, the Port Fountain in Karachi, Pakistan makes it on the list.

Fountain Park in Fountain Hills, Arizona is number 4: it can jet water 171 meters (561 feet) high when the three pumps operate at full capacity, it is usually limited to 91 meters (300 feet).

The Dubai Fountain which made its debut in 2009 is located next to tallest building worldwide, the famous Burj Khalifa. Once every half hour, this fountain begins dancing to pre-recorded songs while shooting water 73 meters (240 feet) high. It also has extreme shooters, rarely used, which go as high as 150 meters (490 feet).

Number 7 is the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet in Canberra, completed in 1970, propelling water 147 meters (482 feet) high.

And at number 8, we have the the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951), measuring 140 meters (460 feet).

The Reason Behind Water Fountains in Japanese Landscapes

Japanese gardens usually include a water feature. They tend to be put right at the entrance of Japanese temples and homes because they are regarded as being representative of spiritual and physical cleansing. Since water is supposed to be the focal point of a fountain, you will find that the designs are kept very simple.

Many people also opt for a water fountain that features a bamboo spout. Underneath the bamboo spout is generally a stone basin which receives the water as it trickles down from the spout. Even when new, it should be designed to appear as if it has been outdoors for a long time. It is important that the overall look of the fountain fits in with the natural setting, so people typically place plants, rocks, and flowers around it. Clearly this fountain is much more than just a beautiful add-on.

An alternate possibility is to buy a stone fountain, set it on a bed of rock, and place live bamboo and pretty stones around it. Over the years it starts to really blend into the surrounding nature as moss blankets the stone.

Anyone who has an extensive spot to work with can, of course, out in a much larger water feature.

Lots of people add a koi pond or a little stream as a final touch.

Japanese fountains, though, do not really need to have water in them. Lots of people decide to represent water with sand, gravel, or rocks rather than putting in actual water. Natural rocks that are smooth and laid out tightly together can be used to create the illusion of running water.

The Marvelous Santa Maria in Cosmedin Fountain in Rome

Archaeologists and restorers alike have stumbled upon a treasure trove of pagan and Christian artifacts on the grounds of Santa Maria in Cosmedin in Rome. The nearby basilica is largely for the marble sculpture known as the Bocca della Verità, (Mouth of Truth) located in its portico. Built in 1719, the Santa Maria in Cosmedin fountain was relatively unknown and situated far from sight making it hard to visit. It was said that there was nothing worth seeing in this area, as it was bleak and desolate making it an unfriendly place to visit. As part of an effort to refurbish the piazza outside the church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin, the Italian architect Carlo Bizzaccheri was commissioned by Pope Clement XI to design a fountain. August 11, 1717 saw the beginning of the task to put down the foundation of the church. The first stone to be placed in the foundation was blessed and medals bearing the illustrations of the Blessed Virgin, for whom the church is named, and St. John the Baptist, the patron saint of water, were also thrown in.


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