A Brief History of Water Features

As initially conceived, water fountains were crafted to be practical, directing water from streams or aqueducts to the inhabitants of towns and settlements, where the water could be utilized for cooking food, washing, and drinking. In the years before electric power, the spray of fountains was powered by gravity alone, usually using an aqueduct or water source located far away in the nearby mountains. Inspiring and impressive, big water fountains have been constructed as monuments in many civilizations. The contemporary fountains of modern times bear little likeness to the first water fountains. 115115-11204__29302.jpg Uncomplicated stone basins created from local rock were the first fountains, used for spiritual functions and drinking water. The oldest stone basins are thought to be from around 2000 BC. The spray of water appearing from small jets was forced by gravity, the only power source designers had in those days. Drinking water was provided by public fountains, long before fountains became decorative public monuments, as striking as they are practical. Fountains with elaborate decoration began to show up in Rome in approximately 6 B.C., commonly gods and animals, made with natural stone or bronze. The impressive aqueducts of Rome delivered water to the eye-catching public fountains, most of which you can visit today.

Where are the Planet's Most Grandiose Water Showpieces?

Referred to as the King Fahd Fountain (1985) found in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, it is the highest continuously operating fountain in the world. It spouts out water reaching 260 meters (853 feet) above the Red Sea.

Coming in 2nd is the World Cup Fountain located in the Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002) with water blasting 202 meters (663 feet).

Located next to the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri, is third placed Gateway Geyser (1995). This fountain is regarded as the tallest in the U.S. with water reaching up to 192 meters (630 feet).

The next on the list is Port Fountain located in Karachi, Pakistan which shoots water 190 meters (620 feet) into the heavens.

Fountain Park in Fountain Hills, Arizona is number 4: it can jet water 171 meters (561 feet) high when the three pumps operate at full capacity, it is usually limited to 91 meters (300 feet).

The Dubai Fountain was opened in 2009 near to Burj Khalifa - the world's highest building. The fountain shoots water up to 73 meters (240 feet) and performs once every half hour to pre-recorded music - and even has extreme shooters, not used in every show, which reach up to 150 meters (490 feet).

Constructed in 1970, the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet in Canberra, Australia, comes in at #7 shooting water up to 147 meters (482 feet).

And finally we have the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951) which measures 140 meters (460 feet) in height.

The Prevalence of Water Features in Japanese Gardens

A water feature is an absolutely vital part of any Japanese garden. Since Japanese water fountains are viewed as symbolic of physical and spiritual cleansing, they are often positioned at the entrance of buildings or shrines. Since water is the most essential element of any Japanese fountain, the design is generally simple.

Bamboo is a common material to use for spouts and therefore often added into water fountains. The basin, which tends to be built of stones, receives the water as it trickles down from the bamboo spout. It must have a worn-down, weathered look and feel as well. So that the fountain looks at one with nature, people normally adorn it with natural stones, pretty flowers, and plants. Clearly this fountain is much more than just a beautiful add-on.

An alternative is to buy a stone fountain, set it on a bed of rock, and place live bamboo and pretty stones around it. In time, as moss gradually covers the stones, it becomes even more natural-looking.

Larger water features can be created if there is enough open land. Nice add-ons include a babbling stream or tiny pool with koi in it.

There are alternative options if you do not want to put water in your Japanese fountain. It is acceptable to use representations of water in lieu of real water, such as sand, rocks, or natural stones. Natural rocks that are flat and laid out tightly together can be used to produce the illusion of flowing water.


Where are the World’s Biggest Water Elements?
Lastly is the Jet d’Eau (1951) in Geneva, Switzerland, which measures 140 meters (460 feet). read more
The Demand for Water Features in Japanese Backyards
There are alternative options if you do not want to put water in your Japanese fountain. Other options include stones, gravel, or sand to represent ... read more