Water Features Recorded by History

8830_0103__47935.jpg Water fountains were at first practical in purpose, used to deliver water from canals or creeks to cities and villages, providing the inhabitants with fresh water to drink, bathe, and cook with. In the years before electricity, the spray of fountains was powered by gravity exclusively, often using an aqueduct or water resource located far away in the nearby hills. Fountains spanning history have been designed as monuments, impressing local citizens and tourists alike. Crude in design, the very first water fountains did not look much like present fountains. The 1st known water fountain was a stone basin carved that was used as a receptacle for drinking water and ceremonial functions. 2000 B.C. is when the oldest identified stone fountain basins were actually used. The first civilizations that utilized fountains relied on gravity to push water through spigots. Positioned near aqueducts or creeks, the functional public water fountains provided the local population with fresh drinking water. Fountains with ornate decoration started to show up in Rome in about 6 B.C., commonly gods and wildlife, made with natural stone or bronze. A well-designed collection of reservoirs and aqueducts kept Rome's public water fountains supplied with fresh water.

Water Fountains: Fundamental in any Japanese Gardens

No Japanese garden is complete without a water element. They tend to be placed right at the entrance of Japanese temples and homes because they are thought to be representative of spiritual and physical cleansing. It is uncommon to see extravagantly-designed Japanese fountains since the emphasis is supposed to be on the water itself.

Many people also opt for a water fountain that features a bamboo spout. The water flows through the bamboo spout and accumulates in the stone basin underneath. It ought to have a worn-down, weathered feel as well.

People want their fountain to appear as natural as possible, so they position plants, flowers, and stones around the fountain. As you can perhaps guess, this fountain is symbolic rather than purely decorative.

If you want to get a bit more artistic, try a stone fountain decorated with live bamboo and other natural elements placed on a bed of gravel. After some years it begins to really blend into the surrounding nature as moss covers the stone.

More substantial water features can be designed if there is enough open land. Think about adding a lovely final touch like a pond filled with koi or a tiny stream.

There are different options if you do not want to put water in your Japanese fountain. Pretty rocks, sand, or gravel are good alternatives to actual water, as they can be used to represent the water. In addition, flat rocks can be laid out close enough together to create the impression of a babbling brook.

A Fabulous Example of Roman Know-How: The Santa Maria in Cosmedin Fountain

Incredible discoveries of both Christian and pagan roots have been made by archaeologists and restorers in the area of Santa Maria in Cosmedin in Rome. The Bocca della Verità (Mouth of Truth} is a renowned marble sculpture situated in the portico of the nearby basilica. Due to the fact that the Santa Maria in Cosmedin fountain (1719) was located off the beaten track, it remained relatively obscure. It was said that there was nothing worth seeing in this area, as it was abject and desolate making it an unfriendly place to visit. As part of a project to revitalize the piazza outside the church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin, the Italian architect Carlo Bizzaccheri was instructed by Pope Clement XI to design a fountain. Work on the church's foundation began on on August 11, 1717. The first stone to be placed in the foundation was blessed and medals bearing the illustrations of the Blessed Virgin, for whom the church is named, and St. John the Baptist, the patron saint of water, were also thrown in.


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