The Prevalence of Fountains in Japanese Gardens

You will never see a Japanese garden that does not include a water element. The Japanese water fountain is considered symbolic of spiritual and physical cleaning, so it is customarily placed in or near the doorways of temples or homes. The design of Japanese fountains tends to be very basic because they are meant to call attention to the water itself.

Many people also opt for a water fountain that features a bamboo spout. The bamboo spout is positioned over the basin, typically made of natural rocks, and water trickles out. 50721md__16697.jpg People typically make them appear weathered and worn, even when they are new. So that the fountain appears at one with nature, people customarily enhance it with natural stones, pretty flowers, and plants. As you can probably guess, this fountain is symbolic rather than just decorative.

If you are searching for another sort of look and feel, you can also get a fountain crafted of stone, place it in a bed of gravel, and decorate it with natural stones and live bamboo. Over the years it starts to really blend into the surrounding nature as moss blankets the stone.

Wherever there is sufficient open space, you have the possibility to build a more extensive water feature. Lots of people include a koi pond or a little stream as a final touch.

There are other options if you do not want to put water in your Japanese fountain. Lots of people choose to represent water with sand, gravel, or rocks rather than putting in real water. You can also assemble flat stones and position them close enough together that they look like water in motion.

A Magnificent Example of Roman Artistry: The Santa Maria in Cosmedin Fountain

Archaeologists and restorers on the lookout for pagan and Christian artifacts in Rome have come across a wealth of them in the area of the Santa Maria in Cosmedin.

The Bocca della Verità (Mouth of Truth} is a famed marble sculpture found in the portico of the nearby basilica. When the Santa Maria in Cosmedin fountain was built in 1719, it was off the beaten track and mostly unknown as a result. It was said that there was nothing worth seeing in this area, as it was abject and abandoned making it an unfriendly place to visit. In order to refurbish the square outside the church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin, Pope Clement XI commissioned an Italian architect by the name of Carlo Bizzaccheri to create a fountain for the area. The work of laying down the church’s foundation began on August 17, 1717. After blessing of the first stone, medals bearing the images of the Blessed Virgin, for whom the church is named, and of St. John the Baptist, the patron saint of water, were tossed into the foundation.

The World’s Tallest Water Fountains

Located in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, the King Fahd Fountain (1985) is the highest continually-functioning fountain worldwide. The water reaches the amazing height of 260 meters (853 feet) over the Red Sea.

Coming in second is the World Cup Fountain located in the Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002) with water blasting 202 meters (663 feet).

Next to the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri, is the Gateway Geyser (1995) which comes in third place. Considered the tallest fountain in the United States, it jets water 192 meters (630 feet) into the sky.

With water ejected 190 meters (620 feet) in the air, the Port Fountain in Karachi, Pakistan makes the list.

Number 4: Fountain Park (1970), Fountain Hills, Arizona - although it can reach heights of 171 meters (561 feet) when all three pumps are operating, it only reaches 91 meters (300 feet) on a normal day.

The Dubai Fountain, opened to the public in 2009, is located near the Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest building. The fountain shoots water up to 73 meters (240 feet) and performs once every half hour to pre-recorded music - and even has extreme shooters, not used in every show, which reach up to 150 meters (490 feet).

Jetting water up to 147 meters (482 feet) high, the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet (1970) in Canberra, Australia, comes in 7th.

The last impressive fountain to make the list is the Jet d’Eau (1951) in Geneva, Switzerland, measuring 140 meters (460 feet).


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