The Minoan Civilization: Fountains

brk-345__75023.jpg On the Greek island of Crete, excavations have discovered conduits of numerous types. In conjunction with offering water, they distributed water which amassed from storms or waste material. The principle materials employed were rock or terracotta. Whenever terracotta was employed, it was normally for channels as well as water pipes which came in rectangular or spherical patterns. These included cone-like and U-shaped terracotta piping which were distinctive to the Minoans. Terracotta pipes were laid below the flooring at Knossos Palace and used to move water. The terracotta conduits were also made use of for gathering and storing water. Therefore, these piping had to be able to: Subterranean Water Transportation: It is not quite known why the Minoans wanted to move water without it being seen. Quality Water Transportation: Many historians believe that these pipes were employed to generate a different distribution system for the residence.

A Fabulous Example of Roman Talent: The Santa Maria in Cosmedin Fountain

Both Christian and pagan relics have been found in large quantities by archaeologists and restorers searching the area of the Santa Maria in Cosmedin in Rome. The famed marble sculpture called the Bocca della Verità (Mouth of Truth) can be seen in the portico of the basilica nearby. When the Santa Maria in Cosmedin water fountain was created in 1719, it was off the beaten track and generally unknown as a result. The part of town where it was situated was forlorn and bleak which generally kept people away. As part of a project to revitalize the square outside the church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin, the Italian architect Carlo Bizzaccheri was commissioned by Pope Clement XI to design a fountain. August 11, 1717 marked the date when construction on the church’s infrastructure started. After blessing of the first stone, medallions with the illustration of the Blessed Virgin, for whom the church is named, and of St. John the Baptist, the patron saint of water, were thrown into the foundation.

How Feng Shui Make Your Yard into Place to Relax

Experience the health benefits of feng shui by adding its design elements into your yard.

Size is not the primary consideration when incorporating feng shui design to your yard. It is terrific to have a huge space to work with, but do not worry if the area is small since you can still incorporate feng shui design.

Whether you are bringing feng shui design to your home or garden, the approaches are the same. In order to understand the energy map, or bagua, of your garden, you will first need to know your home’s bagua.

It is also crucial to know the five elements in the theory of feng shui and how best to use each one to optimize its energy.

The northeast corner of your garden, for instance, connects to personal growth and self-cultivation energy, and Earth is the feng shui element that is necessary to integrate it. A perfect addition to the northeast corner of your yard might be a serene Zen garden decorated with natural stone, as they represent the Earth element in feng shui.

A water feature is a perfect addition to the following feng shui areas: Southeast (money & abundance), East (health & family), and North (career & path in life).


Early Crete & The Minoans: Wall Fountains
Archaeological excavations in Minoan Crete in Greece have exposed a number of varieties of conduits. These delivered water and eliminated it, including water from waste and storms. Rock and terracotta were the materials of choice for these... read more
A Brief History of Garden Water Features
The water from creeks and other sources was originally delivered to the citizens of nearby communities and municipalities by way of water fountains, whose design was primarily... read more