The Biggest Water Features Across the World

Located in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, the King Fahd Fountain (1985) is the highest continually-functioning fountain worldwide. The water reaches the fantastic height of 260 meters (853 feet) over the Red Sea. y98908__30105.jpg

Coming in second is the World Cup Fountain located in the Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002) with water shooting 202 meters (663 feet).

Occupying third place is the Gateway Geyser (1995), situated close to the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri. Regarded as the highest fountain in the United States, it propels water 192 meters (630 feet) into the sky.

Next is the fountain located in Karachi, Pakistan (Port Fountain) which jets water up to 190 meters (620 feet) in height.

Number 4: Fountain Park (1970), Fountain Hills, Arizona - although it can reach heights of 171 meters (561 feet) when all three pumps are operating, it only reaches 91 meters (300 feet) on a normal day.

The Dubai Fountain, opened to the public in 2009, is located near the Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest building. The fountain shoots water up to 73 meters (240 feet) and performs once every half hour to pre-recorded music - and even has extreme shooters, not used in every show, which reach up to 150 meters (490 feet).

Number 7 is the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet in Canberra, completed in 1970, propelling water 147 meters (482 feet) high.

Last of all is the Jet d’Eau (1951) in Geneva, Switzerland, which measures 140 meters (460 feet).

A Magnificent Example of Roman Artistry: The Santa Maria in Cosmedin Fountain

Remarkable discoveries of both Christian and pagan roots have been made by archaeologists and restorers in the area of Santa Maria in Cosmedin in Rome. Located in the portico of the nearby basilica one can see the celebrated marble sculpture known as the Bocca della Verità (Mouth of Truth).

Due to the fact that the Santa Maria in Cosmedin fountain (1719) was located off the beaten track, it remained mostly obscure. It was said that there was nothing worth seeing in this area because it was abject and desolate making it an unfriendly place to visit. As part of an effort to refurbish the piazza outside the church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin, the Italian architect Carlo Bizzaccheri was instructed by Pope Clement XI to design a fountain. Work on the church's infrastructure started on on August 11, 1717. The consecration of the first stone to be placed in the foundation was followed by medals being tossed in bearing the images of the Blessed Virgin, for whom the church is named, and St. John the Baptist, the patron saint of water.

Making the Ideal Sanctuary Indoors or Outside

The right feng shui fountain will go a long way towards helping you build a perfect tranquil haven. This can be attained rather easily with a garden or home waterfall. It will certainly contribute a lot to the interior and exterior of your home. The best location for your outdoor fountain is a spot where you can see it from inside too.

Make sure to include some beautiful flowers and plants, as they enrich any water fountain. Look for plant types that thrive throughout the year. Beautiful rocks, sculptures, or a fireplace are also nice additions.


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